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What’s Wrong with Your Illustration Business?

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Illustration by Thomas James

Whether things are going really well for your illustration business, or really wrong, it’s always a good time to take a look at what you might need to change.

Finding the Weakest Links in Your Business

First I’d like to suggest zooming in a little closer on just the “problems”. Try and figure out what might be standing between you and the success you envision for yourself.

What might you be doing wrong?

What isn’t producing the desired results?

Is anything draining your time and money without offering something in return?

What is stunting your growth as a professional artist?

Once you discover the things that are dragging you down, you can choose to either remove them or make plans fix them, as needed. This may mean anything from making changes to your schedule, revising your promotional strategy, or upgrading your portfolio. Whatever the issue, it can be very useful to single it out, separate it from the pack, and make some strategic decisions about how to make a change for the better.

Identifying “problem areas” of your business can help you to make immediate improvements and potentially free up some valuable resources, which can then be devoted to something more productive elsewhere in your business.

Repairing Your Business

The most important step in this process is to actually do something about the broken parts of your business that are holding you back. This means setting aside time specifically for the purpose of fixing all those things that you promised you’d get to at some later date.

This is one of those aspects of being a freelancer that seems the least rewarding on the surface. It’s not often desirable to think about the negative things, but it’s easier than it sounds, and if you take action now you’ll feel instantly better about where your business is today, and where it’s going. You’ll have less problems affecting your business, and less undesirable tasks filling up your to-do list.

Once you focus on the broken pieces, you’ll be able to turn your attention to the things that are working well, and maybe even make them better with any resources you might have liberated from the wreckage of past mistakes.

Posted by Thomas James on 08/03/15 under business
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Illustrator Submission :: Nick Bear

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Nick Bear is a professional artist with a passion for illustration. His style is bold, colourful and often full of character and humour. This has made him popular among game production companies and his illustrations have featured in some of the world’s most popular games such as Plants vs Zombies 2 and Bejeweled Blitz. If you would like to see more of Nick Bear’s graphic illustrations, please visit his portfolio.

Posted by Chloe Baldwin on 08/02/15 under artists,editorial submissions,illustration
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GROW by Marijke Buurlage

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Submitted by Marijke Buurlage for the Illustration Friday topic GROW.

Posted by Thomas James on 08/01/15 under artists,workshops / conferences
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Part Time Job, Full-Time Artist: Rethinking the Creative Career

Amy Ng blogs at Pikaland, a popular stop for illustration lovers, students and artists who are looking for answers on how to find a balance between art, creativity and commerce.

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Two years ago while I was attending a conference on children’s books in Singapore, I sat in on a panel that consisted of two writers and an illustrator. The one-hour long talk was about their journey and experience, and how they got to where they were, career-wise. When the Q+A session rolled about, I knew what I wanted to ask – it was at the back of my mind when I saw the slides of their journey and creative processes. It slid off my tongue: “How do you guys earn enough to do this for a living, since you only produce about 2 books a year?” 

The room buzzed a little, and murmurs could be heard. It turns out it might be a little sensitive – this topic about money. But I had asked in earnest, because their achievements were not to be scoffed at. However, it didn’t add up, because we all know how long it takes a book to get published. And was there a secret to holding out for a paycheque to cash out in the meantime? It wasn’t meant to put anyone down – I was just really, really curious.

Their answer? Both of them had part-time jobs unrelated to writing/illustrating. They were frank: they couldn’t possibly live off from their books (not at the moment anyway). They told the crowd that having a part-time job freed them of the pressures of having to rely on their books financially – which would ruin their experience of writing/illustrating one. 

It made a lot of sense. And I was thrilled that they didn’t sugarcoat the experience. They told the practical side of a story that not many people care to hear about. Maybe it ruins the perfect illusion – one that spreads the idea that artists are supposed to come out the other end, triumphant after years of struggling alone, working hard on their craft. Although some might find it a silly or even inappropriate question to ask (It’s too personal! No one wants to hear the negative stuff!), I felt it was important. And it’s a pity no one talks about it more within the creative field. 

Beyond the encouraging (and yet irritating) shouts of “Work harder!”, “You’re not doing enough!” and “You need to get out there more!” that’s ringing in the ears of every artists who has tried, failed and tried again, harder; it can mean so much. It means that the idea of an artist, sitting behind their desk, deep in the flow of creating work with no other obligations (financial or otherwise) besides their 100% focus on their art, might be a reality that’s not in line with what a lot of artists are facing. 

Yes, there is a percentage of artists who are able to do it full time, but they add a whole lot of other things to their repertoire too – some teach, some freelance on the side, and others pick up part-time jobs to substitute their income. Besides art patronage (which is harder to come by these days), there’s another way; one that’s not talked about more:  sponsorship. This article – “Sponsored” by my husband: Why it’s a problem that writers never talk about where their money comes from – is a really great article about how artists are doing a disservice to others by not being honest about how they got to where they are. Replace “writer” with “artist” in the article and there’s not much difference – we’ve all gotten help along the way. The question is how much? Was it through your own efforts, or by someone else? No one really talks about where their money comes from (or maybe there’s not enough frank conversations around it to begin with in the first place). 

Some might not need to make money from their art – for some, the love of process is enough. But for many, the financial lift from selling their work isn’t just about making a living. It’s a sign that they’re doing what they love – and are being loved by others as well. Call it validation. Or maybe the fact that it could signal the beginning of a viable business (and no, it’s not a bad word). It’s a value system that rings higher than just dollars and cents.

Taking on another job – part-time or otherwise, doesn’t mean that you’ve hung up your artist hat for good. It just means that you’re being pragmatic and realistic. Money pays the bills and keeps the light on. It keeps your fingers warm enough to move when the temperature outside is freezing. It keeps you from hunger and pain, and it buys you supplies needed for you to work your magic. Above all, having a bit of money ensures that your basic needs are met, so that you can focus on creating great things.

Taking on another job – part-time or otherwise – is also a great way to add another dimension to your work, particularly if you have interests that run outside of art that you can capitalise on. Or perhaps you’re merely taking on extra work to fill the the gaps financially, and are not really into whatever it is you’re doing to help pay the bills. That’s fine too. Whatever works for you. Just remember: if you start to have a strong, adverse reaction to work outside of your creative interests, perhaps it’s time to take a step back and re-evaluate the impact it will have on your art. 

It’s a fine line to tread. You don’t want to be too comfortable that you neglect your art, but you want to earn enough so that you can take the edge off from financial burdens. So what’s the best way to go about it? Pick something that you’re good at. Something that you can do quicker, or better than others. Do something that comes second nature to you (and I’m not talking about lying back on the couch going over Games of Thrones).

I know a few people (myself included) who look for avenues where they can separate their emotions from work. In other words, they are able to distinguish and remove themselves emotionally while completing the task at hand. For example, if you’re a designer during the day, you’ll be using up a lot of creative energy – which makes it a bit harder to squeeze out creative juice for your own personal projects come night-time. The goal is to find that sweet spot between your interests and also what you’re good at – which you might find has no relation to art at all. I’ve known artists who are also accomplished accountants, gardeners and even magazine writers (yours truly).

So throw out the outdated notion of being a starving artist. Keep your hands busy and get out there while you scale your creative heights. Find a job if you have to – so you won’t have to sacrifice your artistic integrity or worry about things like being too hungry to think properly or if you’re struggling to stay afloat under the constant pressure of being evicted from your home. You’ll be able to stay true to your voice and your goals, and enjoy the artistic freedom it offers you.

One caveat though: don’t let the need or want for stability rob you of your passion in the first place. 

It’s a fine line to tread, but that’s a whole different subject altogether.

[Illustration: Jean Jullien]

Posted by Amy Ng on 07/31/15 under artists,business,freelance
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Polish Illustrator Nikola Kucharska

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Nikola Kucharska Website >>

Posted by Thomas James on 07/31/15 under artists,black and white
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Pick of the Week for NATURE and This Week’s Topic

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Happy Illustration Friday, fellow creators!

We’re ready to announce this week’s topic, but first please enjoy the wonderful illustration above by Jessica Roux, our Pick of the Week for last week’s topic of NATURE (you can get a print here). Thanks to everyone who participated with drawings, paintings, sculptures, and more. We love seeing it all!

You can see a gallery of ALL the entries here.

And of course, you can now participate in this week’s topic:

GROW

Here’s how:

Step 1: Illustrate your interpretation of the current week’s topic (always viewable on the homepage).

Step 2: Post your image onto your blog / flickr / facebook, etc.

Step 3: Come back to Illustration Friday and submit your illustration (see big “Submit your illustration” button on the homepage).

Step 4: Your illustration will then be added to the public Gallery where it will be viewable along with everyone else’s from the IF community!

Also be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter and subscribe to our weekly email newsletter to keep up with our exciting community updates!

HAPPY ILLUSTRATING!

Posted by Thomas James on 07/31/15 under artists,collage,editorial submissions,illustration,weekly topics
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Comics Illustrator of the Week :: Phil Noto

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Quietly, one of the best current super-hero series being published is Nathan Edmondson & Phil Noto’s run on Black Widow. I first noticed Noto’s work on Marvel’s Uncanny X-Force, a few years back. His work brings a nice combination of fine art & design aesthetics to mainstream comic books. One of Noto’s earliest and most frequent collaborators was writing team extraordinaire Justin Gray and Jimmy Palmiotti; starting off with a number of issues on their classic Jonah Hex run in the mid-2000’s, then projects like Superman/Supergirl: Maelstrom and Trigger Girl 6 for Image’s Creator-Owned series.

Phil Noto and writer Gerry Duggan received an Eisner award nomination in 2011 for their original comic series The Infinite Horizon, which tells a post-apocalyptic war story inspired by Homer’s Odyssey.

Phil Noto has worked for Disney Animation, as well as a concept artist for video games, including the mega-hit BioShock. Noto continues to be one of the most sought after cover artists in comics. He recently created a series of classic magazine inspired covers for Marvel.

You can follow the latest Noto news and see the newest art on his tumblr site here.

For more comics related art, you can follow me on my website comicstavern.com – Andy Yates

Posted by Andy Yates on 07/30/15 under artists,comic,illustration,weekly topics
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FREE Webinar: Creative Playgrounds

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While making notes for Salli’s upcoming class – BUILD A FREELANCE ILLUSTRATION BUSINESS – she realized that one topic was worthy of it’s own session: Creative Playgrounds, which Salli and her brother/business partner Nate Padavick believe can energize your career. What IS a Creative Playground and why are they so important? Join them for the FREE webinar August 10th at 4:00 EST (or watch any time after the live class).

Take it from Albert Einstein: “Play is the highest form of research.”

Posted by Thomas James on 07/30/15 under business,classes,Events,giveaway,resources,workshops / conferences
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Retro Inspired Illustrations by Jennifer Dionisio

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Jennifero Dionisio Website >>

Posted by Thomas James on 07/30/15 under artists,illustration
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Charlotte Day

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Charlotte Day specialises in creating botanical inspired illustrations, she combines an historical interest in botany with the decorative arts. Charlottes work has featured on editorials and on products such as tents and teapots! Her clients include Random House, Penguin, Liberty and Anthropologie to name a few. 

To see more fantastic work from Charlotte Day visit her website 

Posted by Jessica Holden on 07/29/15 under artists
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