Editorial Submission :: Judith Loske

Post by Natalie

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Judith Loske is a German author and illustrator. She completed her degree in illustration from Ruhrakademie and now works as a freelancer in the field of children’s books. She combines pencil, colored pencil and watercolor to create playful stories and unique characters (with a particular fondness for cats.) A delicate line quality, subtle textures and a soft muted palette result in quiet and quirky illustrations that she describes as “sometimes thoughtful but also full of life and happiness.”

See more of Judith’s work on her website.

Posted by Natalie on 02/18/14 under artists,editorial submissions
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Portraiture :: Bartosz Kosowski

 
by Wendy
 

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Some compelling portraiture by the artist Bartosz Kosowski, see more of his work below!

Facebook | Behance | Portfolio

 

Posted by Wendy Schiller on 02/17/14 under Wendy
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This Week’s Giveaway: More from JetPens!

Good job Illustration Friday community!

And keep it up! You cared, and you shared, and JetPens agreed to another giveaway this week! And again, we’re on the hunt for more sponsors, so the more you share, the more giveaways we can get for you.

The good people at JetPens have donated two more prizes this week. I’m even more sad that I can’t enter this week because these brush pens are the BOMB.

IF-giveaway-2

Here are links to the individual pens to find out more:

How to Enter

Submit an illustration for the topic of the week (here’s how) and also post a link to your entry in the comments section of this blog post by next Friday, February 21st. It’s that easy! We will pick one lucky winner at random from the comments, and our regular Pick of the Week will get the set of two.

How to Help IF Get More Giveaways

SHARE the heck out of this to let companies know that you’re excited about it and you want this to happen all the time! Share everywhere you can, and tag them so they know. Here are a few specific ways to do that.

Thanks again to JetPens for their generous sponsorship of this exciting giveaway.

HAPPY ILLUSTRATING!

Posted by Marc Scheff on 02/14/14 under artists,contests/projects,giveaway
31 Comments

Pick of the Week for PREHISTORIC and Giveaway Winners!

prehistoric

Happy Friday!

We’re excited to announce this week’s topic, but first please enjoy the illustration above by Jim Madsen, our Pick of the Week for last week’s topic of ‘PREHISTORIC’. That also makes Jim one of the two winners of last week’s JetPens giveaway! You can also see a gallery of all the other inspiring entries here.

Announcing the 2 Winners of the JetPens Giveaway!

Congratulations to the following artists for being selected to win a great gift from JetPens:

Pick of the Week – JimMadsen
Winner from the Comments – Steve Loya

To claim your prize simply contact Marc Scheff at marc(at)marcscheff.com with the subject line ‘IFriday Winner’ and he’ll take care of the rest! Thanks again to JetPens for this generous collaboration.

And of course, you can now participate in this week’s topic:

TWISTED

Here’s how:

Step 1: Illustrate your interpretation of the current week’s topic (always viewable on the homepage).

Step 2: Post your image onto your blog / flickr / facebook, etc.

Step 3: Come back to Illustration Friday and submit your illustration (see big “Submit your illustration” button on the homepage).

Step 4: Your illustration will then be added to the participant gallery where it will be viewable along with everyone else’s from the IF community!

HAPPY ILLUSTRATING!

Posted by Thomas James on 02/14/14 under artists
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INTERVIEW: Rebecca Guay

Hello Illustration Friday community!

We caught up with Rebecca Guay this week and she has tons of gems to share in her interview below. Rebecca is a hugely successful illustrator, fine artist and educator. She has done more Magic cards than anyone on the planet (pretty sure), multiple books and graphic novels, held her own gallery shows, and founded both the Illustration Master Class and Smart School. She is also one of the nicest most kind-hearted people I have ever met. I am very excited to share this interview because Rebecca has helped me immensely with my own career, and I think her words below will be useful to many of you.

Rebecca GuayRebecca also just launched a Kickstarter for her Very Fancy art book, Evolution: the Art of Rebecca Guay. The book contains everything from her Magic card work to illustration to fine art. The books will be beautifully bound with red or gold dyed page edges. It is already funded, so buy with confidence.

And now, Rebecca Guay!

 

 


 

rgHi! Thanks for joining us on Illustration Friday, where we sketch to new words/topics every week. We like to draw on Fridays.

1. What do you do to keep up your chops when not working on client work?

This is a challenge for everyone! Most people don’t even consider that it is actually really really emotionally hard to sit down and work sometimes – and that more often than not you just have to put your butt in the chair and DO. I’ve often mentioned that quote by Picasso (I think!) “there’s such a thing as inspiration but it must find you working”  that could not be more true!!

Sometimes i just sit down with a book on tape and start – sometimes I set artificial deadlines – whatever it takes to get me working. Sometimes I take a week off too!!

2. Why did you become an illustrator? Why art, why not fine art, why not a designer?

I thought I would major in painting at Pratt but found out really quickly that in the late 80s the only teachers TEACHING  anyone how to paint something figurative or narrative in any way were the illustration professors! So I went into the COMD dept and majored in illustration. I know that the lines are ( gratifyingly) much more blurry across the genres now- illustrations and gallery- but they weren’t then. If you wanted to paint ANY kind of narrative or figures in any way at all with some real serious skill- it was only the illustration programs that seemed to produce the solid foundations. I have loved doing illustration over the last 21 years- adored so much- and I am equally adoring where artists can go within the gallery world – its an intoxicating time to create work.

I never ever wanted to be a designer- so that was never in question- My mom was one for the Boston Globe and she adored it- but I knew early it wouldn’t be for me. My helpless dramatic heart needed an outlet in paint.

3. How did you find your first client, or how did they find you?

My first real client fount me in an industry paper that used to get sent to publishers- I was a senior at Pratt and was chosen to have a small feature as an “up and comer”. Ron McCutchan from Cricket Magazine called and I did my first peace for cricket in 1992.

4. What were the biggest mistakes you made early in your career? What did you learn?

Even though I started to work pretty quickly and went fully freelance within 8 months of graduating I still regret that I did not have the social confidence to talk more and get to know my illustration community. Even when I was going to big parties when I was a penciller for DC comics -I wish I had spoken more – asked more questions of the great artists I was meeting. I was so nervous when I was introduced to Frank Miller at a DC party they I spilled a drink on his shoe and blurted an apology and ran away. So many missed opportunities! I was at small parties with everyone you could think of: Chris Claremont, Dave McKean, Neil Gaiman, so many others- I could have easily had more than one valuable chat with any of them MORE than once! But I was truly painfully shy – I did not discover myself socially within my artistic community until I was about 35!

Be inquisitive, ask questions, let people get to know you, and be  truly INTERESTED in THEM.

Oh yeah- and don’t book yourself up so heavily when you start to get busy that the work suffers. We ALL seem to do ihat early on– but try not to.

5. What advice would you give to up-and-coming illustrators who want to break in?

First- be really serious about where you need to beef up your portfolio and skills – do GREAT work. Go to all the industry shows all the events where you can meet people face to face, set up table give out cards sell prints at these shows, and go hang out after with the other artists. Always remain strong with your traditional paint skills – don’t  go all digital – it is cutting yourself off from a major source of income if you can’t sell paintings.

Get back to people promptly and very briefly. Beware of an email to an AD or editor that is longer than a well done paragraph.

The time to fix the problems with your portfolio is before you hand it to someone for their opinion – don’t apologize for failings that you know are in it while the AD is looking at it – if there are problems that you know are there then then fix them – apologizing for your portfolio in the moment is a baaad thing.

Be open to constructive critique.

Be fierce, friendly, sincere, KIND, do not trash people (dish a little maybe- but don’t trash anyone!!) and be diligent diligent diligent.

 

rgks

Rebecca’s Kickstarter book cover. There is still time to get your copy.

Rebecca Guay

Rebecca Guay

Rebecca Guay

“Tiger Tiger”

Posted by Marc Scheff on 02/11/14 under Interviews
1 Comment

Editorial Submission :: Xenia Pankowa

Post by James
Editorial Submission :: Xenia Pankowa

Editorial Submission :: Xenia Pankowa

Editorial Submission :: Xenia Pankowa

Editorial Submission :: Xenia PankowaPost by James

Xenia Pankowa is a Berlin-based artist and children’s book illustrator. The illustrations shown above are part of her self-authored picture book “Tasso”, which was selected among the finalists for this year’s Meefisch Prize exhibition in Würzburg.

You can see more of Xenia’s rich, imaginative work on her website.

Posted by James on 02/11/14 under editorial submissions
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Headphones :: Yanni Floros

by <u><a href=”www.wendyschiller.com”>  Wendy </a></u>

 

blind_sided_large chaos_theory_large come_undone_large

Yanni Floros is a traditional artist that works out of Adelaide. He makes huge charcoal works that depict a variety of different things. These are all part of his Headphones series from 2012. Check him out here:

<u><a href=”http://instagram.com/yannifloros?”> Instagram </a></u> | <u><a href=”https://www.facebook.com/pages/Yanni-Floros-Artworks/261030410596415?ref=stream”>  Facebook </a> </u> | <u> <a href=”http://www.yannifloros.com/index.html”>  Portfolio </a> </u>

Posted by Wendy Schiller on 02/10/14 under Wendy
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Enter to Win in the JetPens Giveaway!

IF-giveaway-image

Hello IFri team!

We are super-excited to announce the first in what we hope is a series of giveaways here on Illustration Friday. Read below, enter, and find out how YOU can help us make this a regular thing.

The good people at JetPens have donated two prizes this week. Frankly, I’m a little sad I can’t enter, these pens are wonderful and I use at least a few of them regularly in my own work.

 

IF-giveaway-image

 

How to Enter


Submit an illustration for the topic of the week (here’s how) and also post a link to your entry in the comments section of this blog post by next Friday, February 14th. It’s that easy! We will pick one lucky winner at random from the comments, and our regular Pick of the Week will get the set of two.


How to Help IF Get More Giveaways


SHARE the heck out of this to let companies know that you’re excited about it and you want this to happen all the time! Share everywhere you can, and tag them so they know. Here are a few specific ways to do that.

Thanks again to JetPens for their generous sponsorship of this exciting giveaway.

HAPPY ILLUSTRATING!

Posted by Marc Scheff on 02/07/14 under artists,contests/projects,weekly topics
58 Comments

Pick of the Week for EXOTIC and This Week’s Topic!

david_fedan_illustration_friday_exotic

Happy Friday!

We’re excited to announce this week’s topic, but first please enjoy the illustration above by David Fedan, our Pick of the Week for last week’s topic of ‘EXOTIC’. You can also see a gallery of all the other inspiring entries here.

And of course, you can now participate in this week’s topic:

PREHISTORIC

Here’s how:

Step 1: Illustrate your interpretation of the current week’s topic (always viewable on the homepage).

Step 2: Post your image onto your blog / flickr / facebook, etc.

Step 3: Come back to Illustration Friday and submit your illustration (see big “Submit your illustration” button on the homepage).

Step 4: Your illustration will then be added to the participant gallery where it will be viewable along with everyone else’s from the IF community!

HAPPY ILLUSTRATING!

Posted by Thomas James on 02/07/14 under weekly topics
No Comments

Master of the Month :: Rembrandt

Rembrandt drawn by Rama Hughes

Rembrandt van Rijn was a Dutch painter and printmaker. He was one of the greatest painters in European history. His most famous works include a group portrait called The Night Watch and his numerous self-portraits. Because he painted himself as honestly as possible, his self-portraits as a whole create a unique and intimate autobiography.

Rembrandt van Rijn was born in 1606 in what is now the Netherlands. Even in school, he was interested in painting. He was an apprentice to two successful painters before he started his own workshop where he taught students of his own. Rembrandt’s first important work was painted for the court of The Hague. The prince noticed his painting and began to commission portraits from Rembrandt. The artist used this success to move his business to the growing city of Amsterdam where he had great success as a portrait painter. Important people used to visit his studio to see how the great artist worked and to purchase pieces for their own collections.

Rembrandt met his wife, Saskia, in Amsterdam. They married and made a home in Broadway, the Jewish quarter. He often asked his Jewish neighbors to model for him when he painted scenes from the Bible. Rembrandt also placed himself, his friends, and his family into these historic paintings. Some historians think of these cameos as “a kind of diary, an account of moments in his own life.” Some important qualities of Rembrandt’s paintings are his use of high contrast light and shadow called chiaroscuro, the informality of his subjects, and a deeply felt compassion for mankind regardless of wealth and age.

Rembrandt and his wife suffered several personal tragedies including the deaths of three children. Only their fourth child, Titus, survived to adulthood. Saskia herself died soon after her son’s birth. Rembrandt’s drawings of his wife on her death bed are among his most moving work.

Rembrandt made an excellent living as a painter, but he didn’t manage his money well. He lived beyond his means, bought expensive art, prints, and rarities. To pay his debts, he was forced to sell these treasures and his own paintings. A list of those sales gave historians an idea of how Rembrandt lived. His collections include master drawings, busts from the Roman Empire, and suits of Japanese armor. After the sale, Rembrandt moved to a more modest home and started an art dealership with his son.

Rembrandt died in 1669.

In his lifetime, Rembrandt created more than seventy self-portraits. Some show the artist posing in historical costumes or making faces at himself. His oil paintings trace his maturation from an uncertain young man, to a very successful portrait painter, to his troubled but powerful old age. As a whole, the self-portraits give a remarkably clear picture of the man, his appearance and his psychology, as revealed by his richly aged face. In a letter, Rembrandt explained what he hoped to achieve through his art, “The greatest and most natural emotion.”

Rembrandt’s work can be seen today in museums in America, England, France, Germany, Russia, Sweden, and, of course, the Netherlands. The most important collection is in Amsterdam’s Rijksmuseum. His home in Amsterdam was also preserved as the Rembrandt House Museum.

Aux Yeux Hagards by Rembrandt

OMG, the SELFIES, you guys! When “selfie” was declared the 2013 word of the year, I read several so-so jokes about Rembrandt’s being the original. Whatevs, I didn’t appreciate that at first. After even the slightest scrutiny though, I see what the jokesters were saying. If you take a second to see past the change in fashion, you will recognize Rembrandt as a contemporary. His painting are so fresh. His drawings are so clear. His observations of himself are so beautifully honest. You can see the man. You can feel who he is. Despite the hundreds of years that separate us. That is mastery.

Self-portrait by Rembrandt

Portrait of Rembrandt at top drawn by yours truly, Rama Hughes. Etching and oil painting by the master himself.

 

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Posted by rama on 02/05/14 under artists,master of the month,Rama
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