Archive for the ‘artists’ Category

4 Elements of an Ethical Art Competition

bearpunch_mini1

Art Competitions can be a great way to challenge yourself and show your work to a wider, more relevant audience.

However, there is a difference between fair and unfair competitions, and sometimes even reputable organizations can miss the mark.  That’s why it’s important to evaluate each one on its own terms to ensure that your rights are protected and that you understand what is expected of both you and the contest holder.  Be sure to examine the terms of the competition closely and avoid any contests that potentially compromise your rights as an artist.

To help you determine whether a particular contest is worth your time and money, here are 4 elements to look for in an ethical art competition:

1.  Clearly Defined Terms

All contest holders should define all details of the competition in the call for entries, such as the rules, entry fees, list of judges, judging criteria, and intended usage of the artwork.

2.  Statement of Artist’s Rights

In a fair competition, the artist should retain all ownership and rights to the art, and the contest holder may only use or publish the image as defined in the call for entries.

3.  Fair Award Value

All winners should receive an award that is compatible with fair market conditions in exchange for any rights that are transferred to the contest holder.

4.  Insured Artwork

The condition of original artwork should be protected and insured by the contest holder against until it is returned to the artist.

Because every competition is different, you’ll need to decide for yourself which ones are right for you.  Hopefully, these 4 key factors will help you to separate the fair from the unfair and protect yourself from unethical practices.

How do you choose which contests to enter?  Please share your thoughts in the comments section.

Posted by Thomas James on 02/26/14 under artists,contests/projects
1 Comment

Pick of the Week for TWISTED and Giveaway Winners!

Twist

Happy Friday!

We’re excited to announce this week’s topic, but first please enjoy the illustration above by Patrick Girouard, our Pick of the Week for last week’s topic of ‘TWISTED’. That also makes Jim one of the two winners of last week’s JetPens giveaway! You can also see a gallery of all the other inspiring entries here.

Announcing the 2 Winners of the JetPens Giveaway!

Congratulations to the following artists for being selected to win a great gift from JetPens:

Pick of the Week – Patrick Girouard
Winner from the Comments – Kiriska

To claim your prize simply contact Marc Scheff at marc(at)marcscheff.com with the subject line ‘IFriday Winner’ and he’ll take care of the rest! Thanks again to JetPens for this generous collaboration.

And of course, you can now participate in this week’s topic:

SPACE

Here’s how:

Step 1: Illustrate your interpretation of the current week’s topic (always viewable on the homepage).

Step 2: Post your image onto your blog / flickr / facebook, etc.

Step 3: Come back to Illustration Friday and submit your illustration (see big “Submit your illustration” button on the homepage).

Step 4: Your illustration will then be added to the participant gallery where it will be viewable along with everyone else’s from the IF community!

HAPPY ILLUSTRATING!

Posted by Thomas James on 02/21/14 under artists,weekly topics
No Comments

Editorial Submission :: Judith Loske

Post by Natalie

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Judith Loske is a German author and illustrator. She completed her degree in illustration from Ruhrakademie and now works as a freelancer in the field of children’s books. She combines pencil, colored pencil and watercolor to create playful stories and unique characters (with a particular fondness for cats.) A delicate line quality, subtle textures and a soft muted palette result in quiet and quirky illustrations that she describes as “sometimes thoughtful but also full of life and happiness.”

See more of Judith’s work on her website.

Posted by Natalie on 02/18/14 under artists,editorial submissions
No Comments

This Week’s Giveaway: More from JetPens!

Good job Illustration Friday community!

And keep it up! You cared, and you shared, and JetPens agreed to another giveaway this week! And again, we’re on the hunt for more sponsors, so the more you share, the more giveaways we can get for you.

The good people at JetPens have donated two more prizes this week. I’m even more sad that I can’t enter this week because these brush pens are the BOMB.

IF-giveaway-2

Here are links to the individual pens to find out more:

How to Enter

Submit an illustration for the topic of the week (here’s how) and also post a link to your entry in the comments section of this blog post by next Friday, February 21st. It’s that easy! We will pick one lucky winner at random from the comments, and our regular Pick of the Week will get the set of two.

How to Help IF Get More Giveaways

SHARE the heck out of this to let companies know that you’re excited about it and you want this to happen all the time! Share everywhere you can, and tag them so they know. Here are a few specific ways to do that.

Thanks again to JetPens for their generous sponsorship of this exciting giveaway.

HAPPY ILLUSTRATING!

Posted by Marc Scheff on 02/14/14 under artists,contests/projects,giveaway
31 Comments

Pick of the Week for PREHISTORIC and Giveaway Winners!

prehistoric

Happy Friday!

We’re excited to announce this week’s topic, but first please enjoy the illustration above by Jim Madsen, our Pick of the Week for last week’s topic of ‘PREHISTORIC’. That also makes Jim one of the two winners of last week’s JetPens giveaway! You can also see a gallery of all the other inspiring entries here.

Announcing the 2 Winners of the JetPens Giveaway!

Congratulations to the following artists for being selected to win a great gift from JetPens:

Pick of the Week – JimMadsen
Winner from the Comments – Steve Loya

To claim your prize simply contact Marc Scheff at marc(at)marcscheff.com with the subject line ‘IFriday Winner’ and he’ll take care of the rest! Thanks again to JetPens for this generous collaboration.

And of course, you can now participate in this week’s topic:

TWISTED

Here’s how:

Step 1: Illustrate your interpretation of the current week’s topic (always viewable on the homepage).

Step 2: Post your image onto your blog / flickr / facebook, etc.

Step 3: Come back to Illustration Friday and submit your illustration (see big “Submit your illustration” button on the homepage).

Step 4: Your illustration will then be added to the participant gallery where it will be viewable along with everyone else’s from the IF community!

HAPPY ILLUSTRATING!

Posted by Thomas James on 02/14/14 under artists
No Comments

Enter to Win in the JetPens Giveaway!

IF-giveaway-image

Hello IFri team!

We are super-excited to announce the first in what we hope is a series of giveaways here on Illustration Friday. Read below, enter, and find out how YOU can help us make this a regular thing.

The good people at JetPens have donated two prizes this week. Frankly, I’m a little sad I can’t enter, these pens are wonderful and I use at least a few of them regularly in my own work.

 

IF-giveaway-image

 

How to Enter


Submit an illustration for the topic of the week (here’s how) and also post a link to your entry in the comments section of this blog post by next Friday, February 14th. It’s that easy! We will pick one lucky winner at random from the comments, and our regular Pick of the Week will get the set of two.


How to Help IF Get More Giveaways


SHARE the heck out of this to let companies know that you’re excited about it and you want this to happen all the time! Share everywhere you can, and tag them so they know. Here are a few specific ways to do that.

Thanks again to JetPens for their generous sponsorship of this exciting giveaway.

HAPPY ILLUSTRATING!

Posted by Marc Scheff on 02/07/14 under artists,contests/projects,weekly topics
58 Comments

Master of the Month :: Rembrandt

Rembrandt drawn by Rama Hughes

Rembrandt van Rijn was a Dutch painter and printmaker. He was one of the greatest painters in European history. His most famous works include a group portrait called The Night Watch and his numerous self-portraits. Because he painted himself as honestly as possible, his self-portraits as a whole create a unique and intimate autobiography.

Rembrandt van Rijn was born in 1606 in what is now the Netherlands. Even in school, he was interested in painting. He was an apprentice to two successful painters before he started his own workshop where he taught students of his own. Rembrandt’s first important work was painted for the court of The Hague. The prince noticed his painting and began to commission portraits from Rembrandt. The artist used this success to move his business to the growing city of Amsterdam where he had great success as a portrait painter. Important people used to visit his studio to see how the great artist worked and to purchase pieces for their own collections.

Rembrandt met his wife, Saskia, in Amsterdam. They married and made a home in Broadway, the Jewish quarter. He often asked his Jewish neighbors to model for him when he painted scenes from the Bible. Rembrandt also placed himself, his friends, and his family into these historic paintings. Some historians think of these cameos as “a kind of diary, an account of moments in his own life.” Some important qualities of Rembrandt’s paintings are his use of high contrast light and shadow called chiaroscuro, the informality of his subjects, and a deeply felt compassion for mankind regardless of wealth and age.

Rembrandt and his wife suffered several personal tragedies including the deaths of three children. Only their fourth child, Titus, survived to adulthood. Saskia herself died soon after her son’s birth. Rembrandt’s drawings of his wife on her death bed are among his most moving work.

Rembrandt made an excellent living as a painter, but he didn’t manage his money well. He lived beyond his means, bought expensive art, prints, and rarities. To pay his debts, he was forced to sell these treasures and his own paintings. A list of those sales gave historians an idea of how Rembrandt lived. His collections include master drawings, busts from the Roman Empire, and suits of Japanese armor. After the sale, Rembrandt moved to a more modest home and started an art dealership with his son.

Rembrandt died in 1669.

In his lifetime, Rembrandt created more than seventy self-portraits. Some show the artist posing in historical costumes or making faces at himself. His oil paintings trace his maturation from an uncertain young man, to a very successful portrait painter, to his troubled but powerful old age. As a whole, the self-portraits give a remarkably clear picture of the man, his appearance and his psychology, as revealed by his richly aged face. In a letter, Rembrandt explained what he hoped to achieve through his art, “The greatest and most natural emotion.”

Rembrandt’s work can be seen today in museums in America, England, France, Germany, Russia, Sweden, and, of course, the Netherlands. The most important collection is in Amsterdam’s Rijksmuseum. His home in Amsterdam was also preserved as the Rembrandt House Museum.

Aux Yeux Hagards by Rembrandt

OMG, the SELFIES, you guys! When “selfie” was declared the 2013 word of the year, I read several so-so jokes about Rembrandt’s being the original. Whatevs, I didn’t appreciate that at first. After even the slightest scrutiny though, I see what the jokesters were saying. If you take a second to see past the change in fashion, you will recognize Rembrandt as a contemporary. His painting are so fresh. His drawings are so clear. His observations of himself are so beautifully honest. You can see the man. You can feel who he is. Despite the hundreds of years that separate us. That is mastery.

Self-portrait by Rembrandt

Portrait of Rembrandt at top drawn by yours truly, Rama Hughes. Etching and oil painting by the master himself.

 

Posted by rama on 02/05/14 under artists,master of the month,Rama
No Comments

IF Interviews are Back! This Week: Victo Ngai

The polls were unanimous, and interviews have been missed. So we’re back!

This week we caught up with Victo Ngai. Only five years out of art school, Victo is no longer a “rising star.” From Tomb Raider to the official NYC MTA poster, she not only has a broad client base, she has more gold medal awards than most industry vets. She was kind enough to answer a few questions for us. Enjoy the interview, and enjoy a few of Victo’s wonderful illustrations below.

Victo Ngai

  1. Hi! Thanks for joining us on Illustration Friday, where we sketch to new words/topics every week. We like to draw on Fridays. What do you do to keep up your chops when not working on client work?I love playing drawing games with my friends such as the exquisite corpse and paper telephone. There is this game I came up with during Art Hist class in RISD which is still my favorite: one person doodle random marks/shapes on the paper while the second person complete the drawing into something meaningful with as little strokes as possible. I find games like these really fun and helpful in working out my creative muscle. 
  2. Why did you become an illustrator? Why art, why not fine art, why not a designer?One of my RISD professors told me this back in freshmen year ”Fine artists like to create problems for themselves while illustrators like to solve problems given to them.” I love drawing and I love problem solving, hence illustration. 
  3. How did you find your first client, or how did they find you?My first client was CD SooJin Buzelli. She is the wife of my RISD teacher and mentor Chris Buzelli. I did a piece in Chris’s class which SooJin saw and liked, that’s how I got my first published piece. Very lucky, I must say. 
  4. What were three mistakes you made early in your career? What did you learn?1- Acting too much like a scared student in social events. It made it hard to carry normal human conversations with other illustrators and art directors.
    2- Thinking ADs are above illustrators in the illustration ecosystem. Now I learnt the best working relationship is an equal and respectful one.
    3- Afraid to ask for more budget. It’s a business, if you think your work deserve more money, there’s no shame in asking.
     
  5. What advice would you give to up-and-coming illustrators who want to break in?“It’s not how good you are, it’s how good you want to be.” – Paul Arden.
Sweet Dreams by Victo Ngai

Sweet Dreams by Victo Ngai

Jack and Queen at the Green Mill by Victo Ngai

Jack and Queen at the Green Mill by Victo Ngai for Tor.com

Treacherous Water by Victo Ngai

Treacherous Water by Victo Ngai for Plansponsor Magazine

 

Posted by Marc Scheff on 02/05/14 under artists,Interviews
2 Comments

Editorial Submission :: Mark Bird

Post by NatalieWild-Adventure-Layout

Secret-Treasure

The-Night-Puppeteer

Mark Bird is an illustrator and graphic designer based in Manchester in the UK. He loves designing characters and narratives for children – anything to spark the imagination.  His appreciation of design is brought into every illustration, creating a style that is lovingly crafted, whimsical and evocative. Relishing a challenge, Mark is happiest when pouring his imagination onto paper.

See more of Mark’s work on his website.

Posted by Natalie on 02/04/14 under artists,editorial submissions
No Comments

Master of the Month :: Marc Chagall

Marc  Chagall drawn by Rama Hughes

 

Marc Chagall was named “the quintessential Jewish artist of the twentieth century.” As a pioneer of Modernism, he was always experimenting with new ideas and new methods of expression. Some of his most famous works include The Birthday, I and the Village, and Over the Town.

He was born in 1887 to a poor Jewish family in Russia. He was the eldest of nine children. Chagall began to display his artistic talent while studying at a secular Russian school. He began studying art seriously with Leon Bakst in St. Petersburg in 1907. It was at this time that his distinct style began to emerge. His paintings were about his childhood, a focus that would interest him for the rest of his life.

In 1910, Chagall, moved to Paris. There he painted some of his most famous paintings. He used strong and bright colors to portray the Jewish village in a dreamlike state. Fantasy, nostalgia, and religion came together in Chagall’s otherworldly images.

Chagall visited Russia in 1914 and couldn’t go home because of the outbreak of World War I. He made a home in Vitebsk, Russia. He founded an art school there and, in 1918, he was appointed Commissar for Art. In 1920, Chagall moved to Moscow and designed stage sets for the State Jewish Chamber Theater.

In 1931, Chagall travelled to Israel with his wife, Bella, and his daughter, Ida. While there, Chagall began a series of illustrations to the Bible. He travelled, painted, and drew in Tel Aviv, Jerusalem and Safed. The country left a vivid impression on him. When he returned to Paris, the light and landscape of Israel were echoed in his work.

During World War II Chagall fled to the United States. Through art, he expressed his horror over the Nazi rise to power. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, gave him a retrospective in 1946.

Chagall settled permanently in France in 1948 but he continued to travel and exhibit his artwork around the world. In 1951 he returned to Israel and made his first sculptures. Then he travelled to Greece and Italy. During the 1960s, he created stained-glass windows for the synagogue of the Hadassah University Medical Center, Jerusalem; He painted a ceiling for the Paris Opéra; He designed a window for the United Nations building in New York; He painted murals for the Metropolitan Opera House in New York; and created windows for the cathedral in Metz, France. The Louvre in Paris exhibited his work in 1967–77 and the Philadelphia Museum of Art held a major retrospective of his art in 1985.

Chagall died on March 28, 1985, in Saint-Paul-de-Vence, France.

Der Spaziergang by Marc Chagall

My personal favorite of Chagall’s work is Der Spaziergang. On the simplest level, I just love the image. As a teacher though, I use it and Over the Town as examples for a very fun first grade painting project in which I introduce the students to landscapes and figure drawing.

The I and the Village by Marc Chagall

This year, I also used Chagall as our example for Modernism. Our lessons focused on Modernism as a rejection of tradition and an exploration of new ideas. In this regard, Marc Chagall is a wonderfully inspirational and liberating artist to study. His use of color, fantasy, memory, depth, design, and a variety of media can serve as launch points for innumerable lessons.

Portrait of Marc Chagall drawn by  yours truly, Rama Hughes

 

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Posted by rama on 02/03/14 under artists,master of the month,Rama
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