Archive for the ‘children’s art’ Category

Children’s Illustrator :: Amy Adele

Children's Illustrator :: Amy Adele << Illustration Friday

Children's Illustrator :: Amy Adele << Illustration Friday

Children's Illustrator :: Amy Adele << Illustration Friday

Children’s illustrator Amy Adele is inspired by nature, folk tales and a childlike imagination. Her work is built around a love for hand painted details and the richness of natural earthy colors. We love the whimsy!

See more of Amy’s work on Childrensillustrators.com and her agent’s site.

Posted by Thomas James on 02/20/13 under children's art,children's illustrators
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5 ways to get inspired by children’s artwork

Guest Post by Greg Lewis.

5 ways to get inspired by children’s artwork << Illustration Friday

Anyone who’s spent time around kids knows that they’re natural artists. Crayons and little hands go together like peanut butter and jelly! And while kids of all ages love to create, and they naturally learn important skills like language and fine motor skills along the way, there’s no rule saying we as adults can’t benefit too. Here are some easy ways to let a little of that creative energy rub off on you.

1. Speak universally Kids do this automatically; for us it may take a bit of relearning. Since children create art long before they can write or otherwise communicate with adults, their artwork tells a story with pictures instead of words. We can do this too.(Fundamentally, this is how communication began — as pictures serving as a universal language. A horse is a horse, visually of course, in any language.) Watch how kids use art to present what’s on their minds, and take the hint: Try drawing instead of writing, and tell your stories with your pictures.

2. Notice the details – Have you ever seen a kid’s drawing that *didn’t* have some unexpected little detail? Kids see things differently, and their artwork reflects that — in part through all the little “extra” stuff we adults tend to miss. Since kids use their art to examine people, places and things, learning about them and interpreting their place in the world, their attention to the seemingly unimportant can teach us a lesson about all that we may be overlooking in everyday life. An experiment in kid-like close examination of the world around us can give you a surge of creativity.

5 ways to get inspired by children’s artwork << Illustration Friday

3. Focus – Walk into any preschool classroom during arts and crafts time and you’ll see a room full of kids with more concentration than many of us adults can muster. Little tongues sticking out the sides of mouths, bright eyes laser-locked on the task at hand… that is some intense focus. Society puts a preference on multi-tasking, but in getting more done, we are focusing less on each task, leading to subpar work. Learn from children’s focus on their artwork and try your hand a one-task-at-a-time mentality. Tongue placement is optional.

4. Build self-esteem – “LOOK! I drew it myself!!!” That’s the rallying cry of a child who’s proud of her artwork. No matter how scribbled, messy or unusual the artwork looks, the budding artist will be beaming as she holds that construction-paper canvas aloft. And it’s only natural for us as adults to receive the art with the same gusto, building up and praising the child for whatever she’s created. “That’s awesome, kiddo!” The lesson here? Self-esteem matters, whether you’re growing up or not. Praise for others goes a long way, so make sure you acknowledge when others do a great job, and help to build them up when they fall short. Be confident in yourself, too, and be proud of your accomplishments, small and large. Your successes are important to you, and what’s important to you will be important to others.

5. Have fun and be free – You might say creating art is the “happy place” for many youngsters. There’s something about a fresh set of crayons or bright, colorful markers or messy finger paint that deeply appeals to children. Arts and crafts time for children tends to turn into a wonderful mess, often without the kids even realizing it. That white canvas or blank coloring book is a place where they can be free to create whatever they want. We should look forward to each artwork — and each day, really — with this same approach. The brevity of childhood is a daily reminder that life’s too short to not have fun. So channel your inner little person, learn all you can from any kids you’re lucky enough to spend time with, and grab your camera or sketchpad for an enjoyable and important trip to your “happy place.”

:: Greg Lewis has been writing about children’s artwork as well as visual arts education for kids for more than a decade. When not writing, you can find Greg volunteering with one of Chicago’s many non-profit organizations.

Posted by Thomas James on 02/13/13 under children's art,creativity,guest post
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Watercolor painting with Salt

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Want to make beautiful stars in your night sky painting or add a special sparkle to your painting of a dress?  It is so easy with these three materials:

- Water
- Watercolor paints
- Table salt

First make a painting of your choice – using deep dark colors for night skies or vivid colors for other subject matter. This process works for any sort of painting, even abstract.

While the painting is still very wet, add a sprinkle or pinch of salt to the wet paint.

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Let the painting dry throughly. Then rub off the salt with your fingers!

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The background of this collage is an example of a watercolor/salt painting. The salt pushes the pigment away from the paper and adds a beautiful visual texture. Now go try your own!

Posted by susan on 02/04/13 under children's art,IF Kids,Projects,Uncategorized
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Children’s Illustrator :: Mikela Prevost

Children's Illustrator :: Mikela Prevost

Children's Illustrator :: Mikela Prevost

Children's Illustrator :: Mikela Prevost

Mikela Prevost is an illustrator that gravitates toward that most interesting subject of all. Us. People. Be careful what you do in front of her, because she is discretely sketching it in her sketchbook where you will later find it translated into her latest illustration.

Mikela received her B.A. in Painting and Drawing from the University of Redlands and later went on to receive her M.F.A. in Illustration from Cal State Fullerton. While working on her degree, Mikela found the time to get married, and together they are raising their three very curious kids.

Find more of Prevost’s work on her website.

Posted by Thomas James on 02/04/13 under artists,children's art,children's illustrators
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Children’s Illustrator :: Amy Husband

Children's Illustrator :: Amy Husband << Illustration FridayChildren's Illustrator :: Amy Husband << Illustration Friday Children's Illustrator :: Amy Husband << Illustration Friday

Amy Husband has a passion for children’s picture books and set her heart on a career as an illustrator. She graduated from Liverpool School of Art in 2006, and has since been lucky enough to have two picture books published: ‘Dear Miss’, and ‘Dear Santa’. Her first book ‘Dear Miss’ was voted the winner of the Cambridgeshire Children’s Picture Book Award 2010.

She now lives and works in a little cottage in the beautiful city of York UK.

View more of her work: Website | Children’s Portfolio

 

Posted by Thomas James on 01/21/13 under children's art,collage
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Children’s Illustrator :: Constanze von Kitzing

Children's Illustrator :: Constanze von Kitzing << Illustration Friday Children's Illustrator :: Constanze von Kitzing << Illustration Friday Children's Illustrator :: Constanze von Kitzing << Illustration Friday Children's Illustrator :: Constanze von Kitzing << Illustration Friday

Constanze is an award-winning, German illustrator and author. She has a wide variety of clients in the illustration industry including publishing houses, magazines, newspapers and design companies.

I love her sweet scenes, bright colors and attention to detail!

View more of Constanze von Kitzing’s work on her website. (She has great editorial work there too.) And view more kids work on her Children’s Illustrators Portfolio.

Posted by Thomas James on 01/09/13 under children's art,children's illustrators
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Children’s Illustrator :: Renata Liwska

Artist :: Renata Liwska << Illustration Friday

Artist :: Renata Liwska << Illustration Friday

Artist :: Renata Liwska << Illustration Friday

Artist :: Renata Liwska << Illustration Friday

The children’s artwork by Renata Liwska is as sweet as sugar. Her children’s books include The Quiet Book, The Loud Book!, and Little Panda.

See more of her lovely work on her website.

Posted by Thomas James on 01/02/13 under children's art,children's illustrators
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IF Kids Project :: Marbleizing Paper with Shaving Cream

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Marbleizing paper is a wonderful spontaneous combustion of paint, fluffy foamy cream and printmaking. It’s easy and all ages will enjoy the process. The results are astounding. The paper can be used for so many things: cards, gift tags, artwork, book arts, collage, backgrounds to ink drawings – the possibilities are endless! Here’s all you need to get started:

- Foamy shaving cream
- Liquid acrylics or watered down liquid acrylics
- Paintbrushes
- Cardboard
- Tray or pan to hold the shaving cream
- Hair pick or pencil for swirling paint
- Cardstock to print on

Let’s get started!

Step 1: fill a tray with shaving cream. Smooth it out with the cardboard. Apply your paints with a soft brush in the fashion you desire. There is no wrong way to do this! Drip or drop, make rainbows, or shapes.

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Step 2: Place your cardstock face down on the paint and smooth the back of the paper with your hands to make the paint stick to the paper. Don’t worry about the shaving cream! It comes off next…

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Step 3: Pull off your print and wait for a full minute. It’s hard to wait … I know!

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Step 4: Take a small piece of cardboard or credit card or squeegee if you have one and “shave off” the cream from the paper. Prepare to be amazed!

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Enjoy the fun results!

If you would like to post your photos of your scribbles, we would love to see them! Head over to the IF Kids Facebook page or the Art Labs Kids Facebook page to share them!

:: This post is brought you by Illustration Friday Contributor Susan Schwake. Susan is co-owner and curator of Artstream LLC and though the gallery runs an independent art school serving people of all ages and abilities. She is also the author of Art Lab for Kids: 52 projects in Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Paper and Mixed Media by Quarry Books.

Posted by susan on 12/18/12 under children's art,Projects
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Children’s Illustrators Interview with Lee Wade

Lee Wade founded her own publishing company, Schwartz & Wade Books, one of Random House Children’s Books’ family of imprints. ChildrensIllustrators.com just posted a great interview with her! Here’s a snippet:

Can you tell us about your professional background including how you came to found your own publishing company, Schwartz and Wade Books.

I was an English major at Skidmore College but I always admired the art majors so when I graduated and was offered the position of assistant to the Art Director/Adult Trade Publishing at St. Martin’s press, I jumped on it. I spent 4 years at St. Martin’s designing book jackets and then became the Art Director at MacMillian Publishing. I spent the next 10 years running adult trade art departments and taking on more responsibility and overseeing more and more people. I always liked my jobs.

Find out more about her company and read her thoughts on building your children’s portfolio in this super interview at ChildrensIllustrators.com!

Posted by Thomas James on 12/05/12 under children's art,Interviews
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Children’s Illustrator :: Teresa Jenellen

I can’t find a bit of information about children’s illustrator Teresa Jenellen. But I found her work on Childrensillustrators.com and was wowed. It’s so different from most children’s work. Very striking! If you have info about her, please leave a comment!

See more: Children’s Portfolio

Posted by Thomas James on 12/04/12 under artists,children's art
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