Archive for the ‘creativity’ Category

Finding where you left your inspiration

 

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Do you find you’ve been staring at that blank page for ages, your fine liner’s or paints have began to dry and your idea’s just seem to be at a standstill no matter how much you want to get started. Well my creative friend I think you may have dropped your inspiration somewhere, but don’t panic I’m sure its laying around somewhere waiting for you to find it. All creative people get stuck with art block from time to time and although the frustration can be extremely annoying to the point you may want to scream into the nearest pillow, never fear because here’s a few easy solutions to help get your creativity and inspiration back to where it used to be.

  • Get out of your studio space: Sometimes too much time at your desk or computer can cramp your mind along with your legs, so the best remedy is to get out of your space to clear your head. Go for a walk, drive or run for a change of scenery to promote new idea’s and thought.

 

  • Visit somewhere creatively fuelling: Galleries, degree shows, museums or places of wildlife are perfect places to feed your visual appetite. Whether you’re viewing someone else’s work this may help you visualise different concepts, composition styles, patterns or colour palettes you might not of thought of using before or if you’re out sketching from things in real life making studies may give you the grounds for a specifically theme project that can help you gather idea’s as you go.

 

  • Take a break from the drawing board: The old battery need’s a recharge and despite many of us wanting to be an invincible creative machine that can churn out endless amazing drawings, photos and painting that will dazzle all it’s not physically possible although we can dream.

 

  • Work with a liked minded creative: If the creative juices just aren’t flowing with a pending project often the help of a like minded creative can help pull you out of your rut. Talk with a creative friend about your project in confidence and ask them for points or tips on where to get started, sometimes two heads are better than one.

Image by illustrator Dana Svobodova you can find out more about their work here .

Posted by Kate Leonard on 08/31/14 under creativity
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How to develop your own style?

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Whether you’re an inky illustrator, a passionate painter, daring doodler, pro photographer or more finding that one of a kind style to be known for can sometimes seem a tad tricky to find. No doubt I’m not alone when I say that we can sometimes find ourselves gazing in amazement at the many other creative people in our field and think to ourselves “how am I going to get where they are”.  There may be a creative in particular whom you find yourself admiring both for their style and success acquired because they’re so individual, niche and unique at what they do. So your next head scratching question maybe “how can I develop my own style?” and develop it in a way that is going to make you different to all the other talented creative people in the world, because you yourself are one of a kind and have your own creative imagination to share. Well to answer your question here’s a few points I came up with to think about that may just help you creatively along the way;

  • Know that your style is forever developing and changing along the way

 

  • Your style will have characteristics, textures and a uniqueness of its own so don’t be to concern that it’s nothing like the next guy’s because originality is important

 

  • Discovering your own taste and stick to those tastes this can be anything from techniques to materials or the subject’s you draw, but don’t be afraid to explore beyond that ( don’t get scared to go out of your comfort zone).

 

  • Your style will reflect the kind of work you may want to be commission for, for example do you have a love for the human form, creating portraits of little characters or maybe alternatively you prefer to create sophisticated patterns with lots of colour.

Deep down your style is there you just need to create more to see it and then you can share it with others. Image by designer Lindsay Letters you can find out more about their work here.

Posted by Kate Leonard on 08/17/14 under creativity
1 Comment

Making the most of your sketchbooks

 

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Being creatives we all get lost in the blank pages of our oh so faithful sketchbooks, before putting pen to paper we’re filled with anticipation of the ideas we have within our creative minds that are yet to spill across our page.  As they begin to fill with endless inky pieces of potential and piles of scribbled sketchbooks are formed over time they can often become lost sat within a draw of your studio out of sight. Although sometimes it’s breaking out those old books that can help you creatively in ways you don’t always quite realise. So here are a few reasons to brush the dust off your sketchbooks and reminisce a little in past potential you’ve made.

 

  1. They’re proof of how far you’ve come: Your sketchbooks are filled with your thoughts and scribbles and it’s these that also make them memories of your creative growth.  You might one day find yourself thinking “My illustration/design/painting/photography isn’t quite as detailed or good as these creatives” and sometimes we take for granted just how far we have come on our creative journey.  So look back on your own childhood, high school, college or university sketchbooks and see just how far you’ve come, just how hard you’ve worked and you may even surprise yourself with how talented you really are. In turn this is sure to boost your belief in yourself and blow your little inner critic away.

 

  1. Fruits for new inspiration : If at times you’re feeling lost for ideas or aren’t quite sure where to find your inspiration for a new and exciting project then flipping through the pages of your sketchbook might just help you find it. Sometimes we can forget where we found our fruit for ideas but in that little sketchbook may be a scribbled motif that can help you grow a collection of beautiful patterns, illustration for a book, painting and much more. Recycle your old ideas and make them into something amazing and new because your style and skills are forever growing it’s sure to look different than it did before.

 

  1. Rediscover old techniques:  I remember during college days we were encouraged to experiment as much as we could with a vast array of arty materials and techniques to expand on the potential of what we create. Combining watercolours, print making or markers with ink might have helped you to create a beautifully detailed project or give you a texture or effect you’re looking for. It’s little things like these that may just be the finishing element needed for an upcoming project or simply for you to try something a little different.

 

So it just goes to show how good your sketchbooks can be after all and gives you an even better reason to treasure them and not throw them away. Image by designer illustration  Elizabeth Caldwell you can find out more about her work here .

Posted by Kate Leonard on 08/10/14 under creativity
5 Comments

The Australian Graphic Supply Collective: Tuts and Type

In my journey towards becoming somewhat of a graphic designer, I’ve gone through many bouts of chocolate-fueled rage, cursing when I can’t figure out how to line up my beziers correctly, or how exactly to create a seamless repeat pattern. Although there are loads of tutorials online, the Australia Graphic Supply Company is set to become the “square one” learning source for budding designers and typographers of all types (pun not intended).

Self-described “pixel-wranglers,” Dave and Laura Coleman are a husband-and-wife team working out of Sydney, Australia, focusing on a wide range of visual services from photography and branding to illustration and tattoo design. While Laura mostly manages operations & finances, Dave handles the creative side of their shared business–and both of them share a serious passion for design, photography and lettering.

They host a selection of their own client work on their website, but the primary focus is on their community and growing tutorial section. What’s neat to see is that their tutorial aesthetic matches up perfectly with that of their professional projects–the aim is clearly to give the viewer proper insight into the process of creating high-quality design and typography while simplifying the process down to layman’s terms.

One of my favorite tutorials was Creating a Hand-Lettered Logotype from Beginning to End–I’ve included some screenshots and a video below.

Dave and Laura were briefly living and working abroad in Oviedo, Spain, but are now in the process of returning to their home base in Sydney. To follow along with their adventures, check out their travel blog.

I’ve also included a couple links to my other favorite tutorials below:

No Pain, No Grain (How to Create a Seamless Vector Wood Grain Pattern)

So What’s the Big Deal with Horizontal & Vertical Bezier Handles Anyway?

I can’t wait for more exciting tutorials and developments from the AGSC. Thanks so much to Dave and Laura for sharing their knowledge with us! Follow along with them on theirwebsiteTwitter, and Pinterest.

Posted by Rachel Frankel on 07/29/14 under creativity,design,digital,links,resources,tutorial / how-to,typography
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Dealing with Your Creative Expectations

 

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Following the creative path to live a creative life isn’t always an easy instant road to success.  You’re going to put in the effort and hard work so you’ll no doubt get there but like any journey there will be challenges to face and obstacles to overcome to become who you want to be.  Whether you’re a current art student at college, just graduated from university or are bettering your creative practice in your own time with the aspiration of running your own business there’s one teeny tiny obstacle we all have niggling away inside called “expectations”.

Expectations can be anything from aims you set to accomplishments and standards you may put on yourself or those that people around you may have of you themselves but today I’m going to cover self expectations.  Having expectations in general isn’t a bad thing as they give you points to work on and creative insight into ways you’d like to grow.

However sometimes when we set such high aims to reach and aspiring results to follow, when we fall short it can really knock us down and sometimes make you second guess what you’re doing and why you’re doing it. You may find yourself questioning whether you did something right, whether your skills are at their best , if you met the brief you were set and whether you can be as good as the next guy the list goes on and you’re not alone in thinking so.

 However amongst all this expectation you also need to be your biggest motivator and you need to brush yourself off and tell yourselfBelieve you can and you will achieve all you set out to”.  I believe you can achieve anything if you put the effort and the hard work into all that you do, although one thing you must truly believe in is yourself.  Remember these few things when you feel your inner expectations are clouding your creative motivation;

1. Your work is surely to be at its best when you are as well. 

2. Everyone’s story and journey is different don’t compare your beginning to someone else’s middle.

3.  A success is to be perceived through your own eyes, however if you don’t try you’ll never know how far you could have gone. 

Featured image created by designer Stephanie Ryan and you can find out more about her and her beautiful designs “here” .

Posted by Kate Leonard on 07/16/14 under creativity,freelance
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Cool Stuff :: Hand Made Font

Wendy

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Handmadefont.com is a side project of the Estonian designers Vladimir Loginov and Maksim Loginov. It was founded in 2008 and has some pretty amazing photohraphed typefaces, all made out of found objects and food!

See more on their website

Posted by Wendy Schiller on 04/15/14 under creativity,design,letterpress,photography,Wendy
2 Comments

Mixed Media :: Johan Thornqvist

by Wendy

 

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I love mixed media, and just had to share these neat altered photographs by Johan Thornqvist! He takes the photos on the streets in Sweden, using his phone.

Follow more of his work here :

Pinterest | Portfolio

Posted by Wendy Schiller on 01/27/14 under artists,conceptual,creativity,digital,Wendy
1 Comment

Artist :: Kimika Hara

Posted by Angie

Kimika Hara << Illustration Friday

Kimika Hara << Illustration Friday

Kimika Hara << Illustration Friday

Kimika Hara << Illustration Friday

Kimika Hara is a fascinating artist living in Kyoto, Japan. I absolutely adore her hand-embroidered illustrations– the colors are amazing, the textures created by printed fabrics, stitches, and beads are simply lovely. What a wonderful technique! Unfortunately, I don’t speak Japanese, so I couldn’t find out much about her.

See more of her amazing work: Flickr | Website

Posted by Angie Brown on 06/27/13 under Angie,artists,creativity,embroidery,textiles
21 Comments

Tugboat Printshop

Post by Clio

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The Tugboat Printshop is made up of Paul Roden & Valerie Lueth. They have been working together since 2006, hand-crafting & publishing their original woodcut prints from a studio in Pittsburgh, PA. Roden and Lueth make traditionally crafted woodcut prints by carving original drawings in low relief on blocks of 3/4″ birch plywood. Once carved, these blocks are rolled up with ink and printed onto archival paper to create the finished artworks.  According to the artists themselves if these prints are cared for properly, they will last many lifetimes!

Isn’t the detail breathtaking? I sure hope to own an original Tugboat Printshop print one day…I can imagine it would be a real conversation starter and you would be constantly finding new quirks and hidden details every time you looked at it. The process shots on The Tugboat Printshop’s website are fascinating also.

Posted by Clio Meldon on 06/11/13 under artists,Clío,creativity,design,studio life,woodcut
22 Comments

Artist Kevin Waldron

Post by Clio.

 

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Kevin Waldron is an Irish born illustrator currently living and working in New York City. Kevin makes beautiful picture books for children with funny characters and bold colours and shapes. Kevin’s first book Mr Peek and the Misunderstanding at the Zoo, unveiled Mr Peek, his eccentric and amazing zoo keeper character and it won the Bologna Ragazzi Award Opera Prima Award in 2009. The sequel Pandamonium at Peek Zoo was released in April of this year.

Have a peek at Kevin’s work on his website and you can follow him on twitter too.

 

Posted by Clio Meldon on 05/24/13 under Authors,cartoon,children's art,children's illustrators,Clío,creativity,design,digital,IF Kids
293 Comments

 

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