Archive for the ‘creativity’ Category

Illustrator :: Danielle Kroll

Post by Clio.

 

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illustration-friday-danielle-kroll4 illustration-friday-danielle-kroll5 illustration-friday-danielle-kroll6Danielle Kroll is a Brooklyn based designer and illustrator who graduated from Tyler School of Art with a BFA. Her work is fun & playful yet sophisticated and carries over a vast range of materials. Danielle is inspired by the great outdoors, her childhood, the weird and wacky, and vintage treasures (though some might refer to it as junk). She has worked with clients such as The Land of Nod and Anthropology and also keeps a steady flow of personal work going,  the illustrations above are a mix of both. See more of Danielle’s work on her website.

Posted by Clio Meldon on 05/10/13 under artists,cartoon,Clío,creativity,design,digital
26 Comments

Artist :: Gemma Correll

Post by Clio.

Gemma-Correll-Illustration-Friday1 Gemma-Correll-Illustration-Friday2 Gemma-Correll-Illustration-Friday3 Gemma-Correll-Illustration-Friday4These hilarious drawings by Gemma Correll are sure to put a smile on your face this Friday. Famed for drawing pugs and cats Gemma is a true comic genius. Her witty one liners are coupled perfectly with the little characters of her sketchbooks. And she definitely makes me want a pug (she has two real ones and tons and tons of doodled ones), especially after the release of her newest gem, a book entitled A Pug’s Guide to Etiquette.

Catch more of Gemma’s work on her website & blog.

Posted by Clio Meldon on 05/03/13 under artists,books,cartoon,Clío,comic,creativity,digital,illustrationfriday
451 Comments

Artist :: Kirra Jamison

Post by Clio.

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Kirra Jamison is an Australian artist born in 1982 in Sydney. Kirra grew up in Byron Bay and is currently Melbourne based. Her work is colourful, collage-like and full of beautiful and delicate pattern. Don’t you love those owls?

Check out more of Kirra’s work on her website.

Posted by Clio Meldon on 04/19/13 under artists,Clío,collage,creativity,pattern
24 Comments

Kate Moross is THE coolest.

Post by Clio.

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I had the utmost pleasure of hearing British illustrator and designer Kate Moross speak last weekend at the Offset Design Conference in Dublin.

At just 27 years old Moross blew the crowd away with her witty banter, unbelievable charm and incredible work. Never taking herself or her work too seriously Moross gave the crowd advice on fear (ignore it), the creative ‘wall’ (it doesn’t exist) and following one’s desires (always, always).

Kate Moross is unbelievably cool and mature and you’ll want to hop on twitter right away and follow her. Be sure to check out her website too for more beautifully illustrated type work and video work and design work and branding and clothing and shoes and and and…is there anything this girl can’t do?

Posted by Clio Meldon on 04/12/13 under cartoon,Clío,creativity,design,digital,Lettering,pattern
15 Comments

Artist :: Fuchsia MacAree

Post by Clio.

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Fuchsia MacAree’s crayon-like illustrations are rooted in humour and wit. They are colourful, bright and simple and definitely smile-inducing.

Since graduating from college three years ago MacAree has hit the ground running and not stopped since, working as a freelancer on a multitude of both editorial work and personal projects. Featured above are a selection from the Lookalikes series.

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Most recently MacAree participated the Offset Creative Project 2013 by illustrating a quote from a previous conference speaker on a number of household items which were then sold for charity.

Find out more about the Offset conference for creatives on their website.

For more of Fuchsia MacAree’s work check out her website, facebook and tumblr.

Posted by Clio Meldon on 03/29/13 under apparel / products,artists,cartoon,Clío,creativity,design,digital,everyday art,freelance,illustrationfriday
23 Comments

Artist :: Lan Truong

Post by Clio.

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Lan Truong is a Brooklyn based illustrator and graphic designer with a clear passion for bright colour and strong lines. Her sweet illustrations are simple and expressive. They can’t help but perk you up and make you smile.

Check out Truong’s blog & portfolio website for more of her quirky style.

Posted by Clio Meldon on 03/15/13 under artists,Clío,creativity,design,digital,pattern
26 Comments

Artist :: Alberto Cerriteño

Post by Angie Brown

Artist :: Alberto Cerriteno << Illustration Friday
Artist :: Alberto Cerriteno << Illustration Friday
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Alberto Cerriteño is originally from Mexico City and now lives and works in Portland. He has more than ten years of experience as Art Director in several agencies doing advertising, print, interactive, installations and educational work, and is now a freelance artist and illustrator. Alberto has developed his own very personal technique and style, with its roots in traditional Mexican art with its rich textures and decorative patterns.

Alberto’s colorways are spot on and the geometric rhythms are hypnotic, but for me, it’s really the textures that bring it home.

View more of Alberto’s great work: Portfolio | Blog | Etsy

Posted by Angie Brown on 03/14/13 under Angie,art for sale,artists,creativity,digital,letterpress
23 Comments

Artist :: Denise Nestor

Post by Clio.

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Denise Nestor is an illustrator and artist originally from Mayo in the west of Ireland. She has been living and working in Dublin for nearly ten years. Denise’s illustrations are very sensitive, personal and beautifully natural. The mix of faces, facial structures and animals in her work is at the same time arresting and compelling. I can’t help but stare at these drawings —luckily I was given Unravel for Christmas so I can continue to do so for the rest of my days—the fact that such beauty can be created with a pencil is incredible.

View more of her work on her website and blog.

Posted by Clio Meldon on 03/08/13 under Clío,conceptual,creativity
19 Comments

5 ways to get inspired by children’s artwork

Guest Post by Greg Lewis.

5 ways to get inspired by children’s artwork << Illustration Friday

Anyone who’s spent time around kids knows that they’re natural artists. Crayons and little hands go together like peanut butter and jelly! And while kids of all ages love to create, and they naturally learn important skills like language and fine motor skills along the way, there’s no rule saying we as adults can’t benefit too. Here are some easy ways to let a little of that creative energy rub off on you.

1. Speak universally Kids do this automatically; for us it may take a bit of relearning. Since children create art long before they can write or otherwise communicate with adults, their artwork tells a story with pictures instead of words. We can do this too.(Fundamentally, this is how communication began — as pictures serving as a universal language. A horse is a horse, visually of course, in any language.) Watch how kids use art to present what’s on their minds, and take the hint: Try drawing instead of writing, and tell your stories with your pictures.

2. Notice the details – Have you ever seen a kid’s drawing that *didn’t* have some unexpected little detail? Kids see things differently, and their artwork reflects that — in part through all the little “extra” stuff we adults tend to miss. Since kids use their art to examine people, places and things, learning about them and interpreting their place in the world, their attention to the seemingly unimportant can teach us a lesson about all that we may be overlooking in everyday life. An experiment in kid-like close examination of the world around us can give you a surge of creativity.

5 ways to get inspired by children’s artwork << Illustration Friday

3. Focus – Walk into any preschool classroom during arts and crafts time and you’ll see a room full of kids with more concentration than many of us adults can muster. Little tongues sticking out the sides of mouths, bright eyes laser-locked on the task at hand… that is some intense focus. Society puts a preference on multi-tasking, but in getting more done, we are focusing less on each task, leading to subpar work. Learn from children’s focus on their artwork and try your hand a one-task-at-a-time mentality. Tongue placement is optional.

4. Build self-esteem – “LOOK! I drew it myself!!!” That’s the rallying cry of a child who’s proud of her artwork. No matter how scribbled, messy or unusual the artwork looks, the budding artist will be beaming as she holds that construction-paper canvas aloft. And it’s only natural for us as adults to receive the art with the same gusto, building up and praising the child for whatever she’s created. “That’s awesome, kiddo!” The lesson here? Self-esteem matters, whether you’re growing up or not. Praise for others goes a long way, so make sure you acknowledge when others do a great job, and help to build them up when they fall short. Be confident in yourself, too, and be proud of your accomplishments, small and large. Your successes are important to you, and what’s important to you will be important to others.

5. Have fun and be free – You might say creating art is the “happy place” for many youngsters. There’s something about a fresh set of crayons or bright, colorful markers or messy finger paint that deeply appeals to children. Arts and crafts time for children tends to turn into a wonderful mess, often without the kids even realizing it. That white canvas or blank coloring book is a place where they can be free to create whatever they want. We should look forward to each artwork — and each day, really — with this same approach. The brevity of childhood is a daily reminder that life’s too short to not have fun. So channel your inner little person, learn all you can from any kids you’re lucky enough to spend time with, and grab your camera or sketchpad for an enjoyable and important trip to your “happy place.”

:: Greg Lewis has been writing about children’s artwork as well as visual arts education for kids for more than a decade. When not writing, you can find Greg volunteering with one of Chicago’s many non-profit organizations.

Posted by Thomas James on 02/13/13 under children's art,creativity,guest post
20 Comments

The Sketchbook Project

The Sketchbook Project, in case you haven’t heard of this ingenious and inspiring undertaking, is a collection of creative works in the form of art contributed by people from around the world. (Kind of like Illustration Friday, come to think of it…) In this case, the art is in the form of sketchbooks – more than 22,000 of them and counting – created by some 70,000 artists in more than 130 countries. Wow! The really cool thing is that since its inception 6 years ago, the project has shared the wealth by sending the art around (more than 40,000 miles so far), spreading inspiration and creative collaboration all over. And, just this month, they launched a brand new, reinvented Sketchbook Project, with the goal of making participation easier and more engaging.

Co-Founder Steven Peterman summed it up thusly: “We knew it was time to evolve. The idea of a yearly, traveling project was just not sustainable. We wanted something that would be more accessible to our participants and easier for us to visit more cities and reach more people.

With that in mind, The Sketchbook Project staff created The Mobile Library — a custom-built 16-foot trailer that will travel the country, year-round, reaching as many as 45 cities a year. (It already has a schedule of 20 cities for 2013.) Here’s how they describe the new process: creative-minded people can head over to the website and order an official Sketchbook Project sketchbook. Once you get your sketchbook, you can register your book for one of six tours.

We wanted to allow our participants more options and a chance to ‘curate’ their own tour in some way,” said Peterman.

With each tour, you not only get to select a theme for your book, but you get to select the 3 to 4 city tour your book will go on. Pick a city near you, or pick a whole different part of the country! It’s all up to you. Once your book goes on it’s tour, it will be come part of the permanent collection at The Brooklyn Art Library in Brooklyn, NY. There, visitors can search and look through all 22,000 books in the collection. Want your book to be seen even more? Select the digitizing option when getting your book. The Sketchbook Project digital library has had over 1.3 million books viewed and more than half the books have had over 100 different views.

As Peterman explains, “By selecting the digitizing option, you will open your book to a whole new audience. The digital library receives over 1,700 views a day from people all over the world. It will also allow us to select your book for curated and alternative exhibitions.

Not only will The Mobile Library take the sketchbooks on tour, contributed art will also be used for curated exhibitions using the Project’s past sketchbooks. Just this past month, The Mobile Library brought 1,100 books from the collection to Pittsburgh, Ann Arbor and Cleveland on its inaugural 3-city tour curated by Christopher Jobson from thisiscolossal.com.

Final words from the founders: “It’s never been easier to join The Sketchbook Project, and we want the Illustration Friday community to get involved! Collaboration, participation and creativity are what The Sketchbook Project and Illustration Friday are all about. Put it down in drawing, painting or any medium. Fill a sketchbook and send it out on the road.

::

For more information, or to participate in The Sketchbook Project, go to www.thesketchbookproject.com
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Posted by Thomas James on 11/28/12 under books,contests/projects,creativity,guest post,public art
23 Comments

 

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