Archive for the ‘IF Kids’ Category

Illustrator & Writer Lisa Congdon

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This Art Crush entry has truly been a long time coming. I first came across Lisa Congdon by way of Meighan O’Toole’s former art blog and podcast, My Love For You (which is post-worthy in its own right–it was an enormous source of inspiration for me during my college years). While I definitely gravitated to Lisa’s work on a visual level, it was her personal story that drew me in. Freelance illustration had been her second career. She didn’t start painting or making art until she was 31, and here she was, participating in museum-level shows, working with clients like Chronicle Books, and just being a genuine, successful badass. Lisa is not only someone I look up to artistically–she’s also a prime example of a human being.

Lisa’s art career was secondary, after she accumulated over a decade of experience in the education and nonprofit industries. By pure chance, she stumbled into a painting class and began making art of all kinds from that day forward–fueled by pure joy instead of the desire to succeed quickly. Having always been an avid collector, her random ephemera would find their way into countless collages as well as a series of photos, drawings and paintings that would eventually make up her A Collection A Day project. As she continued to develop her craft and share it with the ever-expanding Internet, people began to catch on. Today, she is an accomplished and prolific working artist, blogger, illustrator, public speaker and writer. Some of her most notable clients to date include The Land of Nod, The Museum of Modern Art, Harper Collins, 826 Valencia and Martha Stewart Living Magazine.

Lisa unabashedly tackles the subjects she is most passionate about, and that fearlessness is expressed effortlessly in the execution of her work. She describes herself as a “visual junkie,” and is deeply inspired by patterns, travel, architecture and vintage packaging, just to name a few. A faithful blogger, Lisa writes about her own process in addition to other artists whom she admires, as well as her life “outside the studio,” which includes swimming, biking, sewing, and traveling. In other words, she’s just making all of us look bad! (I only kid.)

One of the reasons I relate to Lisa’s work is due to the versatility and ever-evolving nature of her aesthetic. Certain characteristics like neon hues and her penchant for all things Scandinavian are mainstays, but she continues to branch out and explore all kinds of mediums (block printing and calligraphy, to name a few). These explorations fuel her work and expand her direction, which is most recently geared towards abstract painting. She’s a wonderful example of why you don’t need to narrow yourself down to one specific style (something I often grapple with).

Lisa is quite a unique artist in that she is not only a creator, but a mentor as well. Breaking into freelance illustration can be a challenging and solitary undertaking, and she continues to give her generous time to those who wish to pursue and learn more about the field through classes, speaking engagements and conferences around the country. I first met Lisa at her first Freelance Illustration class at Makeshift Society back in December 2012, and it was one of my most pivotal learning experiences to date.

Lisa recently released her new book, “Art, Inc.: The Essential Guide for Building Your Career as an Artist,” which is a revolutionary and timely answer to the starving artist stereotype. It covers all areas of the freelance artist’s domain, such as photographing fine art, finding printing services, copyright, and diversifying income. It sits on the shelf above my working desk (I like to call it my “VIP” shelf) as I reference it constantly.

On that same note, I’m very excited to be taking Lisa’s “Become A Working Artist” class through CreativeLive next week! You can follow along with the class virtually by RSVPing here.

To listen to Meighan’s podcast with Lisa, click here. I also highly recommend her feature in The Great Discontent.

Follow along with Lisa below:

Website

Twitter

Blog

Instagram

Purchase Lisa’s books below:

Art, Inc.

Whatever You Are, Be A Good One

A Collection A Day

Posted by Rachel Frankel on 09/28/14 under abstract,apparel / products,artists,children's art,children's illustrators,creativity,design,digital,freelance,Lettering,master of the month,pattern,pen/brush and ink,typography
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Typographer & Font Designer Drew Melton

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Ok, I’ll save you the spiel about how deeply I’ve fallen in love with typography and lettering, as that should be fairly obvious by now. Drew Melton‘s work essentially speaks for itself. His deeply expressive fonts and lettering demonstrate the importance of hand-drawing into the design process. Even in the sharpest, finalized versions of his work, you’ll a spontaneity that’s unmistakably fun and energetic.

Drew is an L.A.-based graphic designer and typographer who’s worked with clients like McCann, Nike, Saatchi & Saatchi, and Penguin Books. He’s had quite the interesting journey to success in the lettering realm, some of which is marked by serious self-reflection and the ability to remain humble.

One of the things that hurled him into the design spotlight was his Phraseology project, started with a few other designers and developers in 2011. Very similar to Erik Marinovich’sFriends of Type blog, Phraseology offers the public a chance to submit any word or phrase to be designed by members of the team. Soon enough, Drew was being commissioned for some big-time typography work by notable clients.

Unfortunately, with that exciting attention also came some consequences. As much as I admire Drew’s hand at lettering, I might be even more enamored with his grace and honesty about his past mistakes.

In January 2013, Drew bravely posted a public apology on his blog to several typographic designers, including Jessica Hische, Jon Contino, Dana Tanamachi, and Darren Booth, for drawing inspiration from their styles in ways that were not entirely “okay.” He spoke openly about his guilt and sadness at realizing that his creative process had been built too closely upon the examples of his heroes, and that his heroes were now upset with him.

The topic of creative originality is probably one of the most sensitive. It’s something that is constantly under debate and argued by strong opinions. I’m a strong believer that nothing is purely unique, especially in this day and age. It’s the nature of craft and evolution to build upon an existing idea. But in an age when visual information is so widely accessible, when an illustrator or designer can essentially educate themselves by opening their web browser–it’s up to the creative to draw the line between inspiration and imitation.

It’s a testament to Drew’s work ethic and passion for the art of typography that he was still able to gain success after this admission. Even while he struggled to define his style in the beginnings of his career, it’s clear that he’s succeeded.

Drew is now focusing on font development in addition to personal design and typography. Some of my favorite fonts of his are LastraHandsome, and Magnifique.

I highly recommend Drew’s interview with the Australian Graphic Supply Company (a previous Art Crush feature), as well as his feature (along with this wife, stylist and co-creative Kelsey Zahn) on Rverie. Follow along with Drew here:

Website Blog Twitter Dribbble

 

Posted by Rachel Frankel on 08/11/14 under design,Lettering,typography
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Illustrator & Creative Director Anna Bond

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In the midst of a world grounded in digital technology, sometimes we need a reminder that good things can still be grounded in reality. This is why we still go visit galleries and museums to see artwork in person (a habit I’m still trying to get better at). This is why we still give each other greeting cards, or why our desks seem to collect countless post-its over time. It can be as simple as opening a letter or unwrapping a present–interacting with real material still matters. 

On that note, I’d like to introduce you to Anna Bond, owner and creative director of Rifle Paper Co.–an inimitable force in the stationery field and beyond.

While Anna now lives and works in Winter Park, Florida, she has roots in New Jersey and received a degree in graphic design in Virginia. After working as an art director and freelance illustrator for a couple years, she discovered (or rekindled, rather) her love for stationery design while illustrating some wedding invitations. As mentioned in her feature on The Every Girl, stationery was the optimal combination of graphic design and illustration that she had been searching for, and so she pushed onwards.

While there’s something to be said for art directing at 21, I admire Anna’s honest and expressive way of dealing with her expectations, realities, and how to improve upon them. She’s spoken before about the first launch of Rifle Paper Co.’s website, detailing product disasters, website crashes, international shipping issues, and taking turns panicking with her husband. Without sounding cruel or spiteful, it’s incredibly comforting to know that someone as ambitious and driven as Anna has screwed up before. And to me, there’s no better way to recover than by succeeding.

Nearly all Rifle Paper Co. products feature Anna’s hand-painted illustrations, which are often nostalgic in style with a pastel palette.

Some of Rifle Paper Co.’s selected clients and collaborative partners: Anthropologie (their very first!), Kate Spade New York, Hygge & West, Chronicle Books, AMC Mad Men, and Penguin Books. I think it’s important to note that the variety of clients reflects Anna’s ability to design for both traditional and modern brands, which can be difficult depending on one’s personal style.

Follow along with Anna and her husband Nathan’s exciting ventures at Rifle Paper Co.’s website, and take a peek at Anna’s portfolio here. You can also find her on Twitter. I particularly enjoyed her Day in the Life feature on Design*Sponge as well.

Posted by Rachel Frankel on 07/05/14 under artists,Lettering,painterly,pen/brush and ink
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Illustrator and Hand-Letterer: Mary Kate McDevitt

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Mary Kate McDevitt is one of the most successful hand-letterers and illustrators working today. A graduate of Tyler School of Art, Mary went on to work at a design studio in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. After 2 years, she moved out west to pursue a freelance illustration and design career in Portland, Oregon before ultimately settling in Brooklyn, New York, which is where she presently resides. While she previously imagined that she would work as an illustrator, dabbling in some lettering on the side–but it turned out to be quite the opposite. Her ever-growing client list includes Chronicle Books, CMYK Magazine, Fast Company, and the United States Postal Service.

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She is specifically inspired by vintage type and techniques, including the ones of her own family. As a teenager, she discovered a plethora of handwritten letters that her mother and aunt wrote to her grandmother during college. She used this inspiration for her Your Handwritten Letters project, a daily hand-lettering exercise. Mary would hand-draw a letter of the alphabet and mail the original to a unique participant each day.

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You can follow along with Mary Kate McDevitt on her websiteblogInstagramDribbble, and can also purchase prints through her Etsy shop. She also has two online classes on Skillshare that can be found here and here

 

 

Posted by Rachel Frankel on 06/20/14 under artists,design,illustrationfriday,Lettering,painterly,pen/brush and ink,technique
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Artist:: Nate Wragg

by Wendy

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I got a kick out of these monsters painted by Nate Wragg. He’s a dynamic illustrator that is featured in Gallery Nucleus and hangs out on the internet as a professor at CGMA. Check out his work: Nucleus | Blogspot

Posted by Wendy Schiller on 11/18/13 under children's art,children's illustrators,Wendy
1,362 Comments

Draw your wish list!

Rama Hughes's Illustrated Wish List

If it’s not worth drawing, it’s probably not worth having after all.

Posted by rama on 11/08/13 under IF Kids,Projects,Rama,the art of living
1,518 Comments

Rama Hughes’s Sketchbook

Sketchbook page by Rama Hughes

For those of you who enjoy sketchbooks as much as I do, HERE is a peek at one of mine. Like all my sketchbooks, it’s mostly filled with drawings of family, friends, favorite places, and things around my home. Since I received this particular book as a gift though, I’ve been sharing pages online and, since I seem to be on a roll, I thought you might enjoy the drawings too. I hope so.

Sketchbook drawing by Rama Hughes

Posted by rama on 07/24/13 under artists,children's illustrators,Rama,the art of living
34 Comments

IF Kids Project :: Quilling

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Imagine by Erin Casner

Quilling is a technique involving rolled, shaped and glued strips of paper.  During the Renaissance monks and nuns embellished book covers with quilled images.  Artists today are taking the art form to new levels, such as this delightful piece by Erin Casner.  Casner’s work combines a joy for color and texture with typography.

Babushka by Yulia Brodskaya

Russian artist Yulia Brodskaya‘s is known for her intricate paper-based designs.  Her clients have
included Neiman-Marcus and Starbucks.  When not working on quilled illustrations for clients,
she creates artworks such as the one above titles “Babushka.” This detail of her art shows how
intricate quilling can be
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Detail of work by Yulia Brodskaya

Interested in trying quilling yourself?  Here are some resources to get you started:

How to Quill

Inna’s Creations

Kinder Art

Posted by Thomas James on 06/12/13 under IF Kids,Lettering,Lindsay,Projects
1,237 Comments

IF Kids :: Art Kits for the Road


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Summer travels are just around the corner.  Are you ready?  Here are some ideas
to keep little hands occupied during long road trips.

I love this sophisticated journal (featured above) by CherieBee, but of course a basic journal is easy to construct with minimal effort.

You will need:
8.5″ x 11″ paper in assorted colors
8.5″ x 11″ cardstock in assorted colors
envelopes –  assorted sizes, all smaller than the the cardstock
glue stick
3-hole punch
3 clip rings
chipboard covers

Let’s create!
1.     Punch 3 holes into your paper, cardstock and chipboard covers.  Consider adding a few journal pages that
provide space to draw and with lines to make writing easier such as these free printables from
Teachers Pay Teachers.
2.     Glue envelopes onto several sheets of cardstock for collecting paper ephemera – ticket stubs, menus, etc.
3.     Arrange paper and cardstock in an order of your choice.
4.     Add the covers and bind together using the clip rings.

Crayon rolls keep the most basic of art essentials neatly organized.  This tutorial from
Pretty Prudent will have you making one in a snap.  Make two – one for crayons and one
for markers.

Posted by Thomas James on 05/29/13 under IF Kids,Projects
7 Comments

Artist Kevin Waldron

Post by Clio.

 

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Kevin Waldron is an Irish born illustrator currently living and working in New York City. Kevin makes beautiful picture books for children with funny characters and bold colours and shapes. Kevin’s first book Mr Peek and the Misunderstanding at the Zoo, unveiled Mr Peek, his eccentric and amazing zoo keeper character and it won the Bologna Ragazzi Award Opera Prima Award in 2009. The sequel Pandamonium at Peek Zoo was released in April of this year.

Have a peek at Kevin’s work on his website and you can follow him on twitter too.

 

Posted by Clio Meldon on 05/24/13 under Authors,cartoon,children's art,children's illustrators,Clío,creativity,design,digital,IF Kids
1,337 Comments

 

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