Archive for the ‘Lettering’ Category

Typographer & Font Designer Drew Melton

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Ok, I’ll save you the spiel about how deeply I’ve fallen in love with typography and lettering, as that should be fairly obvious by now. Drew Melton‘s work essentially speaks for itself. His deeply expressive fonts and lettering demonstrate the importance of hand-drawing into the design process. Even in the sharpest, finalized versions of his work, you’ll a spontaneity that’s unmistakably fun and energetic.

Drew is an L.A.-based graphic designer and typographer who’s worked with clients like McCann, Nike, Saatchi & Saatchi, and Penguin Books. He’s had quite the interesting journey to success in the lettering realm, some of which is marked by serious self-reflection and the ability to remain humble.

One of the things that hurled him into the design spotlight was his Phraseology project, started with a few other designers and developers in 2011. Very similar to Erik Marinovich’sFriends of Type blog, Phraseology offers the public a chance to submit any word or phrase to be designed by members of the team. Soon enough, Drew was being commissioned for some big-time typography work by notable clients.

Unfortunately, with that exciting attention also came some consequences. As much as I admire Drew’s hand at lettering, I might be even more enamored with his grace and honesty about his past mistakes.

In January 2013, Drew bravely posted a public apology on his blog to several typographic designers, including Jessica Hische, Jon Contino, Dana Tanamachi, and Darren Booth, for drawing inspiration from their styles in ways that were not entirely “okay.” He spoke openly about his guilt and sadness at realizing that his creative process had been built too closely upon the examples of his heroes, and that his heroes were now upset with him.

The topic of creative originality is probably one of the most sensitive. It’s something that is constantly under debate and argued by strong opinions. I’m a strong believer that nothing is purely unique, especially in this day and age. It’s the nature of craft and evolution to build upon an existing idea. But in an age when visual information is so widely accessible, when an illustrator or designer can essentially educate themselves by opening their web browser–it’s up to the creative to draw the line between inspiration and imitation.

It’s a testament to Drew’s work ethic and passion for the art of typography that he was still able to gain success after this admission. Even while he struggled to define his style in the beginnings of his career, it’s clear that he’s succeeded.

Drew is now focusing on font development in addition to personal design and typography. Some of my favorite fonts of his are LastraHandsome, and Magnifique.

I highly recommend Drew’s interview with the Australian Graphic Supply Company (a previous Art Crush feature), as well as his feature (along with this wife, stylist and co-creative Kelsey Zahn) on Rverie. Follow along with Drew here:

Website Blog Twitter Dribbble

 

Posted by Rachel Frankel on 08/11/14 under design,Lettering,typography
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Illustrator & Creative Director Anna Bond

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In the midst of a world grounded in digital technology, sometimes we need a reminder that good things can still be grounded in reality. This is why we still go visit galleries and museums to see artwork in person (a habit I’m still trying to get better at). This is why we still give each other greeting cards, or why our desks seem to collect countless post-its over time. It can be as simple as opening a letter or unwrapping a present–interacting with real material still matters. 

On that note, I’d like to introduce you to Anna Bond, owner and creative director of Rifle Paper Co.–an inimitable force in the stationery field and beyond.

While Anna now lives and works in Winter Park, Florida, she has roots in New Jersey and received a degree in graphic design in Virginia. After working as an art director and freelance illustrator for a couple years, she discovered (or rekindled, rather) her love for stationery design while illustrating some wedding invitations. As mentioned in her feature on The Every Girl, stationery was the optimal combination of graphic design and illustration that she had been searching for, and so she pushed onwards.

While there’s something to be said for art directing at 21, I admire Anna’s honest and expressive way of dealing with her expectations, realities, and how to improve upon them. She’s spoken before about the first launch of Rifle Paper Co.’s website, detailing product disasters, website crashes, international shipping issues, and taking turns panicking with her husband. Without sounding cruel or spiteful, it’s incredibly comforting to know that someone as ambitious and driven as Anna has screwed up before. And to me, there’s no better way to recover than by succeeding.

Nearly all Rifle Paper Co. products feature Anna’s hand-painted illustrations, which are often nostalgic in style with a pastel palette.

Some of Rifle Paper Co.’s selected clients and collaborative partners: Anthropologie (their very first!), Kate Spade New York, Hygge & West, Chronicle Books, AMC Mad Men, and Penguin Books. I think it’s important to note that the variety of clients reflects Anna’s ability to design for both traditional and modern brands, which can be difficult depending on one’s personal style.

Follow along with Anna and her husband Nathan’s exciting ventures at Rifle Paper Co.’s website, and take a peek at Anna’s portfolio here. You can also find her on Twitter. I particularly enjoyed her Day in the Life feature on Design*Sponge as well.

Posted by Rachel Frankel on 07/05/14 under artists,Lettering,painterly,pen/brush and ink
2 Comments

Illustrator and Hand-Letterer: Mary Kate McDevitt

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Mary Kate McDevitt is one of the most successful hand-letterers and illustrators working today. A graduate of Tyler School of Art, Mary went on to work at a design studio in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. After 2 years, she moved out west to pursue a freelance illustration and design career in Portland, Oregon before ultimately settling in Brooklyn, New York, which is where she presently resides. While she previously imagined that she would work as an illustrator, dabbling in some lettering on the side–but it turned out to be quite the opposite. Her ever-growing client list includes Chronicle Books, CMYK Magazine, Fast Company, and the United States Postal Service.

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She is specifically inspired by vintage type and techniques, including the ones of her own family. As a teenager, she discovered a plethora of handwritten letters that her mother and aunt wrote to her grandmother during college. She used this inspiration for her Your Handwritten Letters project, a daily hand-lettering exercise. Mary would hand-draw a letter of the alphabet and mail the original to a unique participant each day.

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You can follow along with Mary Kate McDevitt on her websiteblogInstagramDribbble, and can also purchase prints through her Etsy shop. She also has two online classes on Skillshare that can be found here and here

 

 

Posted by Rachel Frankel on 06/20/14 under artists,design,illustrationfriday,Lettering,painterly,pen/brush and ink,technique
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IF Kids Project :: Quilling

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Imagine by Erin Casner

Quilling is a technique involving rolled, shaped and glued strips of paper.  During the Renaissance monks and nuns embellished book covers with quilled images.  Artists today are taking the art form to new levels, such as this delightful piece by Erin Casner.  Casner’s work combines a joy for color and texture with typography.

Babushka by Yulia Brodskaya

Russian artist Yulia Brodskaya‘s is known for her intricate paper-based designs.  Her clients have
included Neiman-Marcus and Starbucks.  When not working on quilled illustrations for clients,
she creates artworks such as the one above titles “Babushka.” This detail of her art shows how
intricate quilling can be
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Detail of work by Yulia Brodskaya

Interested in trying quilling yourself?  Here are some resources to get you started:

How to Quill

Inna’s Creations

Kinder Art

Posted by Thomas James on 06/12/13 under IF Kids,Lettering,Lindsay,Projects
339 Comments

Kate Moross is THE coolest.

Post by Clio.

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I had the utmost pleasure of hearing British illustrator and designer Kate Moross speak last weekend at the Offset Design Conference in Dublin.

At just 27 years old Moross blew the crowd away with her witty banter, unbelievable charm and incredible work. Never taking herself or her work too seriously Moross gave the crowd advice on fear (ignore it), the creative ‘wall’ (it doesn’t exist) and following one’s desires (always, always).

Kate Moross is unbelievably cool and mature and you’ll want to hop on twitter right away and follow her. Be sure to check out her website too for more beautifully illustrated type work and video work and design work and branding and clothing and shoes and and and…is there anything this girl can’t do?

Posted by Clio Meldon on 04/12/13 under cartoon,Clío,creativity,design,digital,Lettering,pattern
15 Comments

Alphabet Posters

My daughter is just starting to be able to sound out words, so I’m hyper-aware of alphabets these days. Especially ones that have fun typography. I thought these alphabet posters were top-notch.

fine little day / handz / creativewildchild / evesand

Posted by Thomas James on 09/04/12 under art for sale,IF Kids,Lettering,typography
28 Comments

 

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