Archive for the ‘Projects’ Category

IF Kids Project :: Circle Collage

In this project, color and shape take center stage.  Use construction paper or mix it up with old photos, newsprint and pages torn from magazines.

To get started you will need:
construction paper – an assortment of colors
paper punch – I used a 1″ and a 2″ circle punch, but you could have just as much fun with a square one.
glue stick
scissors

Let’s create!

1.  Punch circles.  Turn on your favorite music and have fun punching!  Begin at the bottom and work your way around all four edges of the paper.  Trim off the paper’s punched edges and start again.  Continue working in this fashion until you have a desirable assortment.

2.  Arrange your composition.  Layer the circles on top of each other, line them up, or overlap like scales of a snake. You may be as elaborate as you wish.

3.  Glue down your composition.  Once you’ve settled on an arrangement, glue the circles in place using a glue stick.

Posted by Thomas James on 11/06/12 under IF Kids,Projects
1 Comment

IF Kids Project :: Textured Rubbing Plates

 

Don’t recycle that tattered file folder!  Turn it into a rubbing plate to make colorful papers full of patterns and textures.

To get started you will need:
old / used file folder
scissors
pencil
glue (liquid craft / school glue and glue stick)
paper (2 or more sheets)
crayons
masking tape (optional)

Let’s create!

Cut shapes.
Cut the file folder into two along the fold line.  Using one side, cut  a variety of shapes.

Glue the shapes to the plate base.
With liquid craft glue, adhere the shapes to the other half of the file folder, which now acts as the base for the rubbing plate. Allow the glue to dry completely before moving on to the next step.

Rub your crayon over the surface.
Place a sheet of paper over the top of your rubbing plate.  Using the side of the crayon, rub it across the surface of the paper, pressing down as you do it.  You can use one color or experiment with running one color over another. If the paper is shifting as you work, tape the rubbing plate and the paper to your work table with a bit of masking tape at the corners.

  

Collage your rubbings.
Use your rubbings to create a collage.  Cut or tear your rubbings into new shapes and glue them onto another piece of paper.  You may decide to create a separate rubbing for the background.  Once you have arranged your papers into a composition you like, glue them into place.  As paper tends to ripple with liquid glue, switch to a glue stick for this job.

Whether you decide to make a work of art or a cheerful card to post, this process is low on the messy scale and easy enough for preschoolers, just cut the shapes advance for them to arrange and glue into place.

Posted by Thomas James on 10/26/12 under Projects
3 Comments

IF Kids Project :: Crayon Scratchboard

 

Scratchboards are fun to use and easy to make.  This is a basic version using nothing more than a box of crayons, paper and a pencil.  What’s better, if you make a mistake in your drawing, you can “erase” it!

To get started you will need:
crayons
plain white paper
dull pencil
newsprint or brown paper to protect work surface

Let’s create!

1. Protect your work surface.
If you don’t have a designated art table, protect your surface with some newsprint or brown paper.  You could also use a smooth placemat with a hard surface that can be easily cleaned when crayon marks go astray.

2. Make stripes of color.
Use your crayons to cover the paper with colorful stripes. Choose a color palette.  You could create a rainbow of stripes or work with just warm (yellow, orange, red) colors for high contrast.  You are the artist, you decide.  You will want to press hard and cover all the white spaces.

3. Cover the entire surface with black crayon.
Pressing hard with your black crayon, cover the entire surface of your paper so the colors are barely if at all visible.  Your crayon may break from the pressure, that’s okay, keep going.  If you are doing a large piece , you may run out of black, so mix it up with some navy blue.

.

 4. Doodle, draw, illustrate!
Your scratchboard is ready for your ideas.  Use a dull pencil to scratch the surface and reveal the lovely colors below the black.  If you make a mistake, cover it up with more black crayon.

Once finished, frame your creation, add it to the growing collection on the fridge or paste it into your journal as an illustration to your latest poem.

* * * This post is by IF Kids Contributor Lindsay Obermeyer. Lindsay is an artist, designer and author with a passion for textiles, color and chocolate. She views her role as artist to be synonymous with that of an educator and as such has always included teaching as part of her art practice. She’s never sure who learns more, her or her students.  

Posted by Thomas James on 10/17/12 under IF Kids,Projects
No Comments

IF Kids Project :: Six Word Memoir

Hey kids! You are invited to contribute to Smith Magazine’s 6 Word Memoir Project. The magazine has invited students from grade school to grad school to describe their lives in six words and to illustrate those mini-memoirs. A selection of the illustrations will be included in a forthcoming ebook published by TED Books! CLICK HERE for all the details.

Posted by rama on 10/16/12 under IF Kids,Projects
No Comments

IF Kids Project :: Fruit or Vegetable Printing

A recent trip to our local apple orchard inspired this project.  Apples (and other fruits and vegetables) make great stamps for printing a pattern repeat for a mixed media project or even a small roll of gift paper.

To get started you will need:
-   an apple (pear, orange, onion)
-   cutting board
-   knife (used only by an adult)
-   water-soluble printing ink
-   printing brayer
-   old plastic tray
-   paper for printing
-   paper (brown paper, newspaper) to cover work table
-   apron

Let’s create!

1.   Prepare your work surface.
Cover your table with newspaper or brown paper to protect it.  This process is slightly messy, so always better to err on the side of caution.  Put on your apron.

2.   Select your fruit.
Select a fruit or vegetable with an interesting shape or texture when cut in half.  With a sharp knife and a cutting board, cut your selection in two pieces.  Use one half if only using one color or both halves for two colors.

3.   Ink your tray.
Remove the cutting board and knife.  Squeeze a small amount of ink onto the center of the plastic tray.  If you are using two colors, use two trays and brayers.  Smooth out the ink with a brayer.  Don’t have too much fun squishing it around!  The ink dries quickly.

4.   Print your pattern.
Determine your repeat.  Will you make rows?  What about a checkerboard look with two different colors?  Push the cut side into the ink and press it onto your paper.  Repeat until you have covered the entire surface of your paper.  If you run out of ink, reink your tray.  If you aren’t getting an even amount of ink on the surface of the fruit, roll ink across the flat surface with the brayer.

5.   Clean up.
Place your art aside to dry.  Use warm, sudsy water to wash your tray and brayer.  Allow to air dry.  Recycle the newsprint.

Frame your art.  Use it as background for a mixed media piece.  Wrap a present with it.

* * * This post is by IF Kids Guest Contributor Lindsay Obermeyer. Lindsay is an artist, designer and author with a passion for textiles, color and chocolate. She views her role as artist to be synonymous with that of an educator and as such has always included teaching as part of her art practice. She’s never sure who learns more, her or her students.  

 

Posted by Thomas James on 10/10/12 under IF Kids,Projects,Uncategorized
No Comments

Foamy prints!

Want to have some printmaking fun? These are stamps that even the youngest child can “carve” details into.  Let’s go!

Materials:

- ball point pen
– sticky backed craft foam
– foam core or wood scraps
– ink pads
– scissors

1. First draw your idea on the back side of the foam – where the paper is that covers the sticky part.

2. Cut out around the  contour (the outline of the subject).

3. Cut a piece of foam core or wood scrap to fit your foam as a handle or backing for your foamy stamp. Stick your foam onto the backing.

4. Using the ball point pen and pressing hard, detail your stamp with lines, dots, and designs.

Now it’s time to stamp!

Put a few sheets of newspaper under the paper you wish to print on. This gives a little padding to insure good contact between the paper and your stamp. Print away!

Our example shows printed fish on a paper which was prepared with a water colored background. Try making a special background for your stamps too!

* * * This post is brought you by Illustration Friday Contributor Susan Schwake. Susan is co-owner and curator of Artstream LLC and though the gallery runs an independent art school serving people of all ages and abilities. She is also the author of Art Lab for Kids: 52 projects in Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Paper and Mixed Media by Quarry Books.

Posted by susan on 10/09/12 under children's art,IF Kids,Projects
1 Comment

IF Kids Project :: Leaf Studies with Watercolors

Gardens are an excellent source for inspiration. I love to walk around them watching the buzz of activity as bumble bees seek pollen and butterflies dance in the sky. The variety of leaves one can find is astounding! They come in so many shapes and sizes. And have you noticed that some have smooth edges while others are zigzagged?

Let’s have fun studying leaves while creating a cool composition!

To get started you will need: 

- pencil
eraser
paper
- watercolor pencils
- watercolor paint set
- brush
- jar of water
- paper towel
- leaves 

Let’s create! 

1.  Collect leaves.
Go out in your garden and collect and assortment of leaves. Freshly picked large ones are the easiest to use, but even small delicate ones may incorporated. If it is winter and your garden is asleep, use a few from house plants.

2. Arrange your leaves.
Lay your leaves on your paper. Move them around, turning them in different angles. Let a few go off the edge of the page.

3.  Trace your leaves.
Once you are satisfied with your composition, trace each of the leaves. This takes some patience. Start with the big ones that are extra sturdy to get in some practice before you move to delicate ones with zigzag edges. If you make a mistake, no worries, that’s why erasers were invented.

4. Trace over your lines with watercolor pencil.
When you have finished tracing, remove your leaves. Trace over your lines with watercolor pencils. You can use the same color for each leaf or go wild and mix it up by changing colors with each leaf. Watercolor pencils are super fun to use as they allow you to draw delicate lines, but when you run a wet brush over them they will transform into watercolor paint.

5.  Color your background.
Fill in the background, the space around your leaves, with watercolor paint or use your watercolor pencils and run a wet brush over your coloring.  Don’t forget to let your painting dry before you move it!

Tip:  Before switching colors, rinse your watercolor rush out with water and dry it off on the paper towel. This will keep your colors from mixing and turning brown.

* * * This post is by IF Kids Guest Contributor Lindsay Obermeyer. Lindsay is an artist, designer and author with a passion for textiles, color and chocolate. She views her role as artist to be synonymous with that of an educator and as such has always included teaching as part of her art practice. She’s never sure who learns more, her or her students.  

 

Posted by Thomas James on 10/03/12 under IF Kids,Projects
No Comments

Rock on! (A rock painting project!)

Guest Post by Karla from rockthoughts.com, a global art and collaborative storytelling project.

This is Penelope:

She began her life in an elementary school in Missouri, but soon found herself on a cruise to the sunny Bahamas!

This is Mahatma Ghandi:

He is part of the Social Justice Project – one of twelve key social justice leaders honored by the students that painted and showcased them in a local art gallery.

These are two of over 1,300 characters that have been created by children (and adults) around the world in connection with a global art and collaborative storytelling initiative, Rock Thoughts.

The Rock Thoughts project empowers children to connect with others in meaningful ways through creativity. These connections span across countries, races, age, language, religion and even physical location. The process is simple and we’d love to get you involved! It’s easy! Here’s how:

1. Find a rock (or rocks – you can do as many as you’d like).
The rock should be about the size of your palm and preferably smooth. Look for rocks that are interesting and have unusual shapes.

2. Paint your rock.
You can paint your rock to resemble anything you’d like! We are particularly fond of monsters, but we’ve also seen some amazing rock people, animals and even art scenes!

3. Send us a picture of your painted rock.
Place your rock against a white background, making sure it has enough light shining on it (natural light from a window works great!). Snap a picture and send it to hello [at] rockthoughts [dot] com. Include your rock’s location — city/state/country. We’ll use this information to come up with a short, unique code for your rock that you can write on the underside with a permanent marker, along with the phrase: “Please visit rockthoughts.com.”

4. Write a story for your rock.
Once you have finished your rock and penned the code, you get to write the first part of your character’s story! The story can be about anything you’d like (appropriate for children, of course). Then submit the story directly on the Rock Thoughts site. (We also love getting pictures or videos of your rock “in action” — so go nuts and have fun!)

5. Hide your rock.
After you’ve submitted your photo and story, your rock will be posted on the Rock Thoughts site for everyone to see! Anyone can then jump in to comment or continue your rock’s story — Viola, collaboration! You can then hide your rock in a public space for someone else to find. Be creative in your hiding spot (a tree? under a park bench?) and send photos of your rocks in hiding!

Super easy and fun!

Here are a few more characters to inspire you:

Ida Jr. started off in Wisconsin and found her way to a picnic bench in Iowa.

Munch began in a school in Illinois and found himself in the capital of Brazil.

Ssslithers went into hiding in Illinois and showed up on a mailbox in South Korea.

You never know where your rocks might end up or how their story will develop! What you do know is that you will have participated in a global adventure, collaborating with people from all over in the world to create something new and wonderful.

We are happy to help along the way so please don’t hesitate to contact us at hello [at] rockthoughts [dot] com. Have fun!

:: Karla Valenti is the founder of NiSoSa, an enterprise that designs resources promoting the development of children’s creativity. Rock Thoughts, a global art and collaborative storytelling initiative, is one of NiSoSa’s most recent projects. You can learn about other projects at www.nisosa.com. Karla can be reached at karla.valenti@nisosa.com.

Posted by Thomas James on 10/02/12 under guest post,IF Kids,Projects
2 Comments

IF Kids Project :: Tissue Paper Drawings


Here it comes! Another installation of Illustration Friday Kids Projects!

This lesson is taken straight from my book by Quarry publishers: Art Lab for Kids. Remember though – you are allowed to try this out too!
Sometimes it’s super fun to “draw” with something other than a pencil. I also find that tearing up paper in general is a very relaxing activity… don’t you?!

So for this adventure all you need to gather is:

• Assorted-colored tissue paper
• White glue thinned with water
• A soft paintbrush
• A piece of card stock to glue your “drawing” to
• Pencil (if desired!)
• Mirror 

To get started:

1. Using a mirror or a photograph of yourself — take a good look at the shape of your face. Is it round-ish? Square-ish? You decide!

2. Start by drawing a light outline of the shape of your face. Of course you don’t have to use the pencil at all — you can just start gluing the paper in the shape that you observed. Below the artist used a pencil and started gluing the background first, but you choose. You are the artist!

3. Give yourself a neck too!

4. Tear some paper and glue it down. Make sure to brush the glue ON TOP of the paper to really stick it down.

(Tip: Keep the paper in a pile or a box away from the glue so it doesn’t get too sticky.)

5. Layers of tissue paper make it appear darker, so try layering the papers as you go to darken shadow areas.

6. Keep tearing the paper to make your picture. Glue down all stray corners!

7. Make sure to glue down colorful tissue papers to make your skin color, eye color and other facial features, too!

When you’re done, we want to see it!! Post your photos of your tissue paper drawings on the IF Kids Facebook page and the Art Labs Kids Facebook page to share them!

::

This post is brought you by Illustration Friday Contributor Susan Schwake. Susan is co-owner and curator of Artstream LLC and though the gallery runs an independent art school serving people of all ages and abilities. She is also the author of Art Lab for Kids: 52 projects in Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Paper and Mixed Media by Quarry Books.

Posted by susan on 09/11/12 under IF Kids,Projects
No Comments

IF Kids Project :: Scribble Drawings

Materials needed:
Paper
Pencil
Scissors
Watercolors or crayons or colored pencils or oil pastels

Start your Scribble Drawing!:

1. Put your pencil down on your paper and scribble in slow circular motions around your paper.

(Tip: Use your whole arm for nice loopy loops.)

2. Try and make it one continuous line.

3. Stop drawing after a few minutes and pick up your paper and take a look inside your scribbles!

4. Don’t see anything? Turn your paper another way and again — you have four views per paper…

5. Still don’t see anything? Get a buddy to take a look!

6. When you find your special something inside your drawing, outline it with the pencil.

7. Cut it out! Add color and put glue it onto another background.

8. Find more scribble drawings inside your loops and add them to your picture!

* * * * *

This fun project comes from my book Art Lab for Kids and has been done by hundreds of people with new results each time! Try it for yourself!

If you would like to post your photos of your scribbles, we would love to see them! Head over to our new IF Kids Facebook page or the Art Labs Kids Facebook page to share them!

::

This post is brought you by Illustration Friday Contributor Susan Schwake. Susan is co-owner and curator of Artstream LLC and though the gallery runs an independent art school serving people of all ages and abilities. She is also the author of Art Lab for Kids: 52 projects in drawing, painting, printmaking, paper and mixed media by Quarry Books.

 

Posted by susan on 08/27/12 under children's art,everyday art,IF Kids,Projects
2 Comments

 

Submit your illustration:

 
Select an image on your computer:
Choose File no file selected
 
Google+