Create Your Own Inspiration Mood Board

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There’s nothing better to get a new creative project started than by making  your own inspirational mood board.  Creating your own mood board of idea’s and inspiration will help you to build a collection of concept base ideas to build a new art piece from whether a series of illustrations, photographs or painting. It’s not all that hard to do and once you get started creating a mood board can actually be a really enjoyable part of project building,  although if you’ve not made one before here are afew easy tips to help you get started on making your own.

What do I put in a mood board?

A mood board can contain anything from doodles, words, photographs, textures , colour swatches, fabrics and much more based around a chosen theme for your project. So for example a theme maybe “ocean” to which you’d include images of its inhabitants , sea blue colour tones and meaningful words tied to the theme etc.

What do I need to make one ? 

Its really down to personal preference but you can make a mood board easily in anything from the pages in your sketchbook, sticking them to a piece of artboard or a cork board with pins. There’s really no right or wrong way because your mood board is personal, there to give you idea’s and pull together concepts for your project that will help it grow.

Putting a mood board together.

  1. To begin putting your creative mood board together collect a series of images and inspirational materials linked to your chosen theme.
  2. On an a3 blank sketchbook page ( or any page size of your preference but bigger is less limiting to your mood board ideas) begin to add your mood board research to your page.
  3. Stick bits down with patterned washi tape or masking tape to make it more visual and allow you to change things around.
  4. Make it personal and have fun.
  5. Keep your creative mood board  in sight throughout your project to stay visually inspired and consistant to your project theme to prevent getting creatively lost along the way.

Image by  illustrator Katt Frank  you can find out more about their work here .

Posted by Kate Leonard on 10/05/14 under creativity,technique,tutorial / how-to
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Pick of the Week for WISH and This Week’s Topic

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Happy Friday!

We’re excited to announce this week’s topic, but first please enjoy the illustration above by Lydia Guadagnoli, our Pick of the Week for last week’s topic of ‘WISH’. You can also see a gallery of all the other inspiring entries here.

And of course, you can now participate in this week’s topic:

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Here’s how:

Step 1: Illustrate your interpretation of the current week’s topic (always viewable on the homepage).

Step 2: Post your image onto your blog / flickr / facebook, etc.

Step 3: Come back to Illustration Friday and submit your illustration (see big “Submit your illustration” button on the homepage).

Step 4: Your illustration will then be added to the participant gallery where it will be viewable along with everyone else’s from the IF community!

Also be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter and subscribe to our weekly email newsletter to keep up with our exciting community updates!

HAPPY ILLUSTRATING!

Posted by Thomas James on 10/03/14 under artists,weekly topics
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Keith Negley – Emotive Editorial Illustration

Post by Heather Ryerson

Keith Negley

Keith Negley

Keith Negley

Keith Negley

Keith Negley

Keith Negley’s moody, evocative editorial illustrations cannot be dismissed with a glance. They instead capture and entrance viewers, provoking pensive contemplation. Negley’s work combines high concept with strong composition and refined color palettes to create sophisticated yet accessible visuals that strengthen the written works they accompany. His illustrations can be found in respected news publications such as The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Los Angeles Times, and NPR as well as among the pages of top publishing houses McSweeney’s and Nobrow. He attended The School of Visual Arts in New York and now lives in Washington.

See more of his work in his portfolio or on his blog.

 

Posted by Heather Ryerson on 10/02/14 under artists,Blogroll,conceptual,editorial submissions
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Comics Illustrator of the Week :: Jae Lee

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I was introduced to Jae Lee’s artwork when he took over on Marvel’s Namor back in the early 90’s. He was one of the talented young artists that joined Image Comics in the mid 90’s, working on such titles as WildC.A.T.S. Trilogy and Youngblood Strikefile, before launching his creator-owned comic, Hellshock. Jae Lee returned to Marvel in 1998, when he collaborated with writer Paul Jenkins on a new 12 issue Inhumans series. His work on the Inhumans ushered in a new level of depth, and maturity to his work that would only grow, and grow into the next decade.

Other notable works are Stephen King’s Dark Tower comics adaptation, Fantastic Four 1234 with Grant Morrison, and The Sentry for Marvel. In addition to that, Jae Lee has become a highly sought after, and prolific cover artist; notably his recent string of covers for DC’s  New 52 Batman/Superman series, and the Jason Aaron Wolverine relaunch a few years ago.

Jae Lee was born in South Korea in 1972 and immigrated to the United States with his parents in 1977. He started his professional comics career at the age of 19, drawing short stories for Marvel’s anthology Marvel Comics Presents.

Jae Lee won an Eisner in 1999 for his work on the Inhumans, and was nominated for Best Cover Artist in 2002.

You can catch up with the latest news, and see more of Jae Lee’s art on this website.

For more comics related art, you can follow me on my website comicstavern.com - Andy Yates

Posted by Andy Yates on 10/02/14 under artists,comic,illustrationfriday,weekly topics
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Artist: Katie Hampson

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K Hampson

After attending the Buy Art Fair 2014 in Manchester at the weekend, I saw the lovely work of Katie Hampson, a fine artist and illustrator from the North West of England. Hampson’s work initially struck me with their looseness and vibrant colour depicting several animals. At the art fair, the artist was undertaking a live art demonstration where she proved her skills and talent. I was able to briefly meet Hampson and ask about her main inspirations which she responded by telling me her main influences are drawn from animals, music and from her own imagination.

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Katie Hampson Live

If you want to view more of Katie Hampson’s work see her website or Facebook page.

 

Thanks for reading,

Carla

Posted by Carla Taylor on 10/01/14 under artists
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Editorial Submission :: Barry Lee

Post by Natalie

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Barry Lee is an Atlanta based freelance illustrator who has a love for bright colors, weird characters and pop culture. He feels humor can be universal through illustration and gains inspiration everywhere from early eighties funk records to the Muppets. Follow him on Instagram @barrydraws for daily sketches.
You can see more of Barry’s work on his website.

Posted by Natalie on 09/30/14 under artists,editorial submissions
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How to Deal with Creative Disappointment

 

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There are times when despite our efforts we all feel disappointment in some of the things we may do creatively. Like for example when you didn’t quite get that illustration sketch right only to screw it up into a ball of scribbly disappointment landing on the floor behind you or when something you put alot of heart into didn’t turn out exactly how you’d wanted.

With the creatively good we get the bad , I mean if everything in each talented creatives journey went right we’d all be rolling into success feeling very happy with ourselves prancing in a field of flowers with sketchbook in hand ( you get the jist).  Even after a blow of disappointment though its what you do after that is important to both regaining your own self confidence within your creative self to overcome disappointment and continue to create something amazing.

Here’s 3 ways to overcome any creative disappointment :

1.  Sketch it out talk it out  – Disappointment and negativity can really make our creative brain foggy meaning that it’s often hard for us to see outside of the fact we didn’t do to well. I find that when I’m feeling this way talking it out with a friend or taking time to sketch out what I did and why it didn’t work, helps me to better understand where I went wrong and feedback from a friend can help me learn how I could improve.

2. Look at the bigger picture - Even though that one thing may not have worked out, looking at the bigger picture can help you see things more clearly and in perspective. Look at how far you’ve come, how much you’ve grown and improved at your creative practice whatever it maybe , you may have not succeeded this time but you can use your experience to make the ” bigger picture” better in the future.

3. See an imperfect thing perfectly  – Lastly understand that nothing is perfect , being your worst critic isn’t going to help you become the aspiring creative you want to be so be kind to yourself and know that no matter what nobodies perfect. Every success creative whether illustrator or painter has had their own falls, but if you’re able to rise from the fall you’ll become all the more stronger a person.

Image by artist Aled Lewis  you can find out more about their work here .

Posted by Kate Leonard on 09/28/14 under artists
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Illustrator & Writer Lisa Congdon

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This Art Crush entry has truly been a long time coming. I first came across Lisa Congdon by way of Meighan O’Toole’s former art blog and podcast, My Love For You (which is post-worthy in its own right–it was an enormous source of inspiration for me during my college years). While I definitely gravitated to Lisa’s work on a visual level, it was her personal story that drew me in. Freelance illustration had been her second career. She didn’t start painting or making art until she was 31, and here she was, participating in museum-level shows, working with clients like Chronicle Books, and just being a genuine, successful badass. Lisa is not only someone I look up to artistically–she’s also a prime example of a human being.

Lisa’s art career was secondary, after she accumulated over a decade of experience in the education and nonprofit industries. By pure chance, she stumbled into a painting class and began making art of all kinds from that day forward–fueled by pure joy instead of the desire to succeed quickly. Having always been an avid collector, her random ephemera would find their way into countless collages as well as a series of photos, drawings and paintings that would eventually make up her A Collection A Day project. As she continued to develop her craft and share it with the ever-expanding Internet, people began to catch on. Today, she is an accomplished and prolific working artist, blogger, illustrator, public speaker and writer. Some of her most notable clients to date include The Land of Nod, The Museum of Modern Art, Harper Collins, 826 Valencia and Martha Stewart Living Magazine.

Lisa unabashedly tackles the subjects she is most passionate about, and that fearlessness is expressed effortlessly in the execution of her work. She describes herself as a “visual junkie,” and is deeply inspired by patterns, travel, architecture and vintage packaging, just to name a few. A faithful blogger, Lisa writes about her own process in addition to other artists whom she admires, as well as her life “outside the studio,” which includes swimming, biking, sewing, and traveling. In other words, she’s just making all of us look bad! (I only kid.)

One of the reasons I relate to Lisa’s work is due to the versatility and ever-evolving nature of her aesthetic. Certain characteristics like neon hues and her penchant for all things Scandinavian are mainstays, but she continues to branch out and explore all kinds of mediums (block printing and calligraphy, to name a few). These explorations fuel her work and expand her direction, which is most recently geared towards abstract painting. She’s a wonderful example of why you don’t need to narrow yourself down to one specific style (something I often grapple with).

Lisa is quite a unique artist in that she is not only a creator, but a mentor as well. Breaking into freelance illustration can be a challenging and solitary undertaking, and she continues to give her generous time to those who wish to pursue and learn more about the field through classes, speaking engagements and conferences around the country. I first met Lisa at her first Freelance Illustration class at Makeshift Society back in December 2012, and it was one of my most pivotal learning experiences to date.

Lisa recently released her new book, “Art, Inc.: The Essential Guide for Building Your Career as an Artist,” which is a revolutionary and timely answer to the starving artist stereotype. It covers all areas of the freelance artist’s domain, such as photographing fine art, finding printing services, copyright, and diversifying income. It sits on the shelf above my working desk (I like to call it my “VIP” shelf) as I reference it constantly.

On that same note, I’m very excited to be taking Lisa’s “Become A Working Artist” class through CreativeLive next week! You can follow along with the class virtually by RSVPing here.

To listen to Meighan’s podcast with Lisa, click here. I also highly recommend her feature in The Great Discontent.

Follow along with Lisa below:

Website

Twitter

Blog

Instagram

Purchase Lisa’s books below:

Art, Inc.

Whatever You Are, Be A Good One

A Collection A Day

Posted by Rachel Frankel on 09/28/14 under abstract,apparel / products,artists,children's art,children's illustrators,creativity,design,digital,freelance,Lettering,master of the month,pattern,pen/brush and ink,typography
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Master Spotlight :: Salvador Dali

Salvador Dali drawn by Rama Hughes

Salvador Dali was a Spanish artist and an icon of Surrealism. Surrealism was an art movement known for dreamlike imagery. His most famous work is The Persistence of Memory, a painting of melting clocks.

Salvador Felipe Jacinto Dalí y Domenech was born in1904, in Figueres, Spain. The young Dali was intelligent and advanced for his age, but he got angry easily and was punished for that. His father was a lawyer and very strict. His mother though forgave his occasionally odd behavior. At an early age, Salvador was created sophisticated drawings. His parents built him an art studio, organized his first exhibition, and sent Dali to drawing school. He was an oddball a daydreamer. By the time he was fourteen years old though, he earned a public exhibition at the Municipal Theatre.

In school, Dali was influenced by numerous artists and art movements, especially Cubism, Dadaism, and the work of classical painters like Raphael and Velasquez. After school, he travelled to Paris where he met influential painters like Pablo Picasso, Joan Miro, and Rene Magritte who introduced Dali to Surrealism. His first experiments were oil paintings, small collages of dream images. His classical, detailed technique created a fantastical realism in these dreamscapes. Dali’s biggest contribution to Surrealism was a mental exercise (that he called the “paranoiac-critical method”) that helped him access his subconscious to enhance his creativity. It became a way of life for Dali, and he became a living symbol of the Surrealist movement. His most famous painting, The Persistence of Memory, is also one of the best-known pieces of Surrealist art. Also called Soft Watches, the painting shows pocket watched melting in a landscape. It suggests many ideas including one that time is not rigid and that everything is destructible.

Over time, Dali became infamous for his odd behavior. He grew a famously long mustache, wore capes, and attended parties in strange clothing like wetsuits or women’s clothes. Critics said that his eccentricity overshadowed his art work. His peers organized a “trial” to expel him from the Surrealist Movement. They claimed that it was because Dali refused to take a stand against Fascism, but Dali was been famously apolitical. It is more likely that the other Surrealists were simple embarrassed by Dali’s weirdness.

During World War II, Dali and his wife lived in the United States. While he was there, the Metropolitan Musem of Art hosted a retrospective of his work. Dali wrote an autobiography, The Secret Life of Salvador Dali. He moved away from Surrealism to create scientific, historical, and religious paintings. He called this period “Nuclear Mysticism.” Those paintings were famous for their technical brilliance. They incorporated geometry, optical illusions, and holography.

When he moved back to Spain, he purchased the remains of the Municipal Theatre that hosted his first show. He train formed the property into the Teatro-Museo Dali or the Dali Theatre Museum. The museum opened in 1974. It was based on Dali’s designs, and is considered the largest Surrealist structures. Right now, it contains the broadest range of work by the artist from his earliest experiments to artwork that he created in the last years of his life.

In his old age, Dali’s failing health forced him to retire from painting. He died a few years later at the age of 84.
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I saw an exhibit of Dali’s work when I was pretty young, and I was disappointed to see it in person for some reason. The images I’d seen in books were so interesting and weird. The actual paintings were meticulous and more carefully created than I imagined. Now though as an artist and a teacher, I appreciate the skill and patience that went into these amazing flights of imagination.

Salvador Dali Painting

I am in the process of teaching my students about Dali right now. Besides being an incredible inspiration to them creatively, his traditional approach to painting gives me an opportunity to teach fundamental skills. In the past month, I have used his example to teach form, depth, perspective, juxtaposition, composition, and more. They’re also pretty tickled by his sense of humor and incredible quotes.

Portrait of Dali drawn by yours truly, Rama Hughes

Posted by rama on 09/26/14 under master of the month,Rama
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Editorial Submission :: Jessica Roux

Post by James

Editorial Submission :: Jessica Roux

Editorial Submission :: Jessica Roux

Editorial Submission :: Jessica Roux

Editorial Submission :: Jessica Roux

Jessica Roux is a Brooklyn based illustrator and designer. She is originally from the woodlands of North Carolina, where she grew up surrounded by an abundance of nature. Using subdued colors and rhythmic shapes, she renders flora and fauna with intricate detail reminiscent of old world beauty.

You can see more of Jessica’s work on her website.

 

Posted by James on 09/24/14 under editorial submissions
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