Dealing with Your Creative Expectations

 

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Following the creative path to live a creative life isn’t always an easy instant road to success.  You’re going to put in the effort and hard work so you’ll no doubt get there but like any journey there will be challenges to face and obstacles to overcome to become who you want to be.  Whether you’re a current art student at college, just graduated from university or are bettering your creative practice in your own time with the aspiration of running your own business there’s one teeny tiny obstacle we all have niggling away inside called “expectations”.

Expectations can be anything from aims you set to accomplishments and standards you may put on yourself or those that people around you may have of you themselves but today I’m going to cover self expectations.  Having expectations in general isn’t a bad thing as they give you points to work on and creative insight into ways you’d like to grow.

However sometimes when we set such high aims to reach and aspiring results to follow, when we fall short it can really knock us down and sometimes make you second guess what you’re doing and why you’re doing it. You may find yourself questioning whether you did something right, whether your skills are at their best , if you met the brief you were set and whether you can be as good as the next guy the list goes on and you’re not alone in thinking so.

 However amongst all this expectation you also need to be your biggest motivator and you need to brush yourself off and tell yourselfBelieve you can and you will achieve all you set out to”.  I believe you can achieve anything if you put the effort and the hard work into all that you do, although one thing you must truly believe in is yourself.  Remember these few things when you feel your inner expectations are clouding your creative motivation;

1. Your work is surely to be at its best when you are as well. 

2. Everyone’s story and journey is different don’t compare your beginning to someone else’s middle.

3.  A success is to be perceived through your own eyes, however if you don’t try you’ll never know how far you could have gone. 

Featured image created by designer Stephanie Ryan and you can find out more about her and her beautiful designs “here” .

Posted by Kate Leonard on 07/16/14 under creativity,freelance
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Comics Illustrator of the Week :: Brian Bolland

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Brian Bolland is a legend in comics, and would be just for his covers alone, but he’s also responsible for drawing classics like Batman: The Killing Joke, and Judge Dredd. He started his art career in his native United Kingdom illustrating his own fanzines while at art school, and then he moved on to contributing to underground publications like Friendz, Oz, and International Times. After he finished his course at The Central School of Art & Design in London in 1973 Bolland joined the talent agency Bardon Press Features, and was assigned various small comics jobs including a bi-weekly Nigerian comic called Powerman about an African superhero. Steady work continued from there, and he would eventually get to work on future comics hits 2000 AD, and Judge Dredd in the late 70′s.

He was recruited by Green Lantern artist Joe Staton who discovered him at a comics convention while visiting England, and thus the British Invasion of comics officially began! He started off doing covers for DC Comics, and then moved onto bigger projects like the 12 issue maxi-series Camelot 3000 with writer Len Wein. Later on he would be put more to use as a cover artist exclusively, rather than an interior artist, because his cover work is so detailed, and striking that I can only imagine how many thousands of comics he sold just based off his cover illustrations alone! Legendary covers for Grant Morrison’s Animal Man, The Invisibles, Wonder Woman, and The Flash solidified Brian Bolland as a legend in the industry. Throughout his carreer Bolland would also work on personal projects like the more sketchy styled Mr. Mamoulian, and the provocative The Actress and the Bishop.

In 2006 the book The Art of Brian Bolland was published, and it provides a very comprehensive overview of Bolland’s career including just about all of his classic covers, and examples of his photography work that he took while traveling the world over the years.

Brian Bolland has won numerous comics industry awards including over 5 Eisners, an Inkpot Award, and Favourite Artist in the British section of the Eagle Awards.

You can follow Brian Bolland on his blog here.

For more comics related art, you can follow me on my website comicstavern.com - Andy Yates

Posted by Andy Yates on 07/16/14 under artists,comic
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Editorial Submission :: Jeremy Norton

Post by James

Editorial Submission :: Jeremy Norton

Editorial Submission :: Jeremy Norton

Editorial Submission :: Jeremy Norton

Editorial Submission :: Jeremy Norton

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Jeremy Norton is a British fine artist and a commercial illustrator working digitally and living in Barcelona.

His work captures the joy, adventure and discovery of growing up. A prolific painter and drawer as a child he seeks to convey that sense of wonder in his current work.

Jeremy’s illustration is influenced by both classic and modern animation and also by Turner, Rembrandt, Titian, impressionist painting and classic 20th century photography and films.

You can see more of Jeremy Norton’s work here.

Posted by James on 07/15/14 under editorial submissions
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Pick of the Week for FRAGILE and This Week’s Topic

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Happy Friday, er Monday?!

Apologies for the late topic announcement this week, everyone. I’ve attended the ICON Illustration Conference over the past week and no matter how I try to prepare for it, I always get sucked into a black hole of awesome so the rest of the world temporarily becomes invisible.

We’re excited to announce this week’s topic, but first please enjoy the illustration above by Maja Wrońska, our Pick of the Week for last week’s topic of ‘FRAGILE’. You can also see a gallery of all the other inspiring entries here.

And of course, you can now participate in this week’s topic:

INVISIBLE

Here’s how:

Step 1: Illustrate your interpretation of the current week’s topic (always viewable on the homepage).

Step 2: Post your image onto your blog / flickr / facebook, etc.

Step 3: Come back to Illustration Friday and submit your illustration (see big “Submit your illustration” button on the homepage).

Step 4: Your illustration will then be added to the participant gallery where it will be viewable along with everyone else’s from the IF community!

Also be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter and subscribe to our weekly email newsletter to keep up with our exciting community updates!

HAPPY ILLUSTRATING!

Posted by Thomas James on 07/14/14 under weekly topics
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Illustrator and Cartoonist Jillian Tamaki

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Sometimes, you get stuck at a crossroads between two things you really love doing. For me, it’s being an illustrator and a musician. Years ago, I thought that I’d eventually have to drop one to wholeheartedly pursue the other. I was never able to decide what I loved more, because although different in myriad ways, my love for playing/creating music and my love for creating art are completely equal in nature.

Jillian Tamaki is a bit of a kindred spirit in this sense, although hers is a tug-of-war between illustration and cartooning. She’s been able to integrate both of these passions into an impressive creative career, having released two graphic novels with her cousin Mariko Tamaki and two books of personal work on her own–not to mention the plethora of illustration awards she’s achieved. Her ever-growing client list includes the likes of The New York Times, National Geographic, Penguin Books, The New Yorker, and WIRED.

Jillian grew up in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, and went on to study illustration at the Alberta College of Art & Design. While she originally intended to focus on design, she fell in love with illustration and began freelancing after a brief stint at Bioware, a Canada-based video game company. She works both digitally and physically, showcasing her general badass brushwork and drafting skills in addition to embroidery (!!!).

Her creative process is impressively flexible, shifting between rapid-fire deadlines and long-term projects.

This One Summer and Skim, while not necessarily limited to the teen reading section, exemplify the Tamaki cousins’ wish to expose more nuanced examples of teenage girls in literature (“not-slim, would-be Wiccan goth”) and graphic novels/comics. They don’t shy away from the heavy stuff–sexual identity, suicide, being a general loner. And perhaps there’s no better way to tell the stories of these painful experiences than through Jillian Tamaki’s gorgeous, expressive linework. Skim went on to win The New York Times’ award for Best Illustrated Children’s Book of 2008.

Jillian’s exuberant, sarcastic personality is only complemented by her genuine desire to help others, especially in the creative community. She’s provided a wealth of advice on her website in the FAQ section, and also welcomes questions on her blog.

You can follow along with her at her websiteTwitterblog, and Tumblr. She also runs a webcomic at Mutant Magic, which will soon be published by Drawn & Quarterly in 2015. Jillian also teaches illustration at School of Visual Arts.

Posted by Rachel Frankel on 07/13/14 under artists,cartoon,comic,design,embroidery,illustrationfriday
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Kei Meguro

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Kei Meguro

Kei Meguro was born in Japan but now lives and works in New York as a graphic designer and illustrator. She refined her techniques at the School of Visual arts receiving a BFA in graphic design. Her clients include Chanel, Nylon Magazine and Sony Music Entertainment to name a few.

To see more of Kei Meguro’s work check out her website, tumblr  or behance.

Posted by Jessica Holden on 07/13/14 under artists
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Catherine Lepage: Simple, clever editorial illustration

Posted by Heather Ryerson

Catherine Lepage

Catherine Lepage

Catherine Lepage

Catherine Lepage

Catherine Lepage

After studying graphic design and illustration, Catherine Lepage worked at an ad agency where she brainstormed quick and clever ideas and developed an efficient process of creating simple design solutions. She went on to co-found Montreal design studio Ping Pong Ping where she weaves illustration throughout her client work. Catherine Lepage continues to work as an editorial illustrator. See more of her work on her website.

Posted by Heather Ryerson on 07/11/14 under Blogroll,design,editorial submissions
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Artist: Audrey Roger

Article by Oli Rogers

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What are these photos doing on Illustration Friday? Sure, they’re great photos and everything, but isn’t this blog supposed to be about illustration?

Look a little closer and you will find the answer: believe it or not, every one of these objects – from the lens of the vintage camera to the cigarette butts in the ashtray – have been meticulously crafted out of paper by artist and illustrator Audrey Roger. Audrey’s work is a great example of how innovative illustrators can look beyond more commonplace media to create striking and memorable images.

Marvel at more of Audrey’s incredible paper creations over at her website, where you can also browse a selection of her mesmerising geometric designs.

Posted by Oli Rogers on 07/10/14 under artists
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Editorial Submission :: Marijke Buurlage

Post by Natalie

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Marijke Buurlage is a Dutch illustrator who lives in Alkmaar, the Netherlands. She graduated from Academie Minerva Groningen in 2013 and has been working as a freelance illustrator ever since. She loves illustrating children’s books, music related projects, screen printing, and drawing animals. She also runs the online shop Viktori featuring her own illustrated products.

See more of Marijke’s work on her website.

Posted by Natalie on 07/09/14 under artists,editorial submissions
1 Comment

Comics Illustrator of the Week :: Leila del Duca

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I recently discovered Leila Del Duca’s work on the excellent new comic Shutter, published by Image Comics. It’s exciting to see a young artist find the perfect project for their specific set of skills, and watch them tap into their potential month in, and month out.

Leila has been drawing comics since she earned her Bachelors degree in illustration from the Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design in Denver, CO back in 2007. She’s had a prolific career so far, drawing a number of comics including Escape From Terra, The Pantheon Project and Deadskins. She also served as Art Director for the Denver-based anthology Cellar Door in 2011.

She currently lives in Missoula, Montana, and you can follow her on her blog here.

For more comics related art, you can follow me on my website comicstavern.com - Andy Yates

Posted by Andy Yates on 07/09/14 under artists,comic,weekly topics
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