Typographer & Font Designer Drew Melton

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Ok, I’ll save you the spiel about how deeply I’ve fallen in love with typography and lettering, as that should be fairly obvious by now. Drew Melton‘s work essentially speaks for itself. His deeply expressive fonts and lettering demonstrate the importance of hand-drawing into the design process. Even in the sharpest, finalized versions of his work, you’ll a spontaneity that’s unmistakably fun and energetic.

Drew is an L.A.-based graphic designer and typographer who’s worked with clients like McCann, Nike, Saatchi & Saatchi, and Penguin Books. He’s had quite the interesting journey to success in the lettering realm, some of which is marked by serious self-reflection and the ability to remain humble.

One of the things that hurled him into the design spotlight was his Phraseology project, started with a few other designers and developers in 2011. Very similar to Erik Marinovich’sFriends of Type blog, Phraseology offers the public a chance to submit any word or phrase to be designed by members of the team. Soon enough, Drew was being commissioned for some big-time typography work by notable clients.

Unfortunately, with that exciting attention also came some consequences. As much as I admire Drew’s hand at lettering, I might be even more enamored with his grace and honesty about his past mistakes.

In January 2013, Drew bravely posted a public apology on his blog to several typographic designers, including Jessica Hische, Jon Contino, Dana Tanamachi, and Darren Booth, for drawing inspiration from their styles in ways that were not entirely “okay.” He spoke openly about his guilt and sadness at realizing that his creative process had been built too closely upon the examples of his heroes, and that his heroes were now upset with him.

The topic of creative originality is probably one of the most sensitive. It’s something that is constantly under debate and argued by strong opinions. I’m a strong believer that nothing is purely unique, especially in this day and age. It’s the nature of craft and evolution to build upon an existing idea. But in an age when visual information is so widely accessible, when an illustrator or designer can essentially educate themselves by opening their web browser–it’s up to the creative to draw the line between inspiration and imitation.

It’s a testament to Drew’s work ethic and passion for the art of typography that he was still able to gain success after this admission. Even while he struggled to define his style in the beginnings of his career, it’s clear that he’s succeeded.

Drew is now focusing on font development in addition to personal design and typography. Some of my favorite fonts of his are LastraHandsome, and Magnifique.

I highly recommend Drew’s interview with the Australian Graphic Supply Company (a previous Art Crush feature), as well as his feature (along with this wife, stylist and co-creative Kelsey Zahn) on Rverie. Follow along with Drew here:

Website Blog Twitter Dribbble

 

Posted by Rachel Frankel on 08/11/14 under design,Lettering,typography
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Illustrator Submission :: Katherine Hardy

Post by Chloe

Crystal City  Katherine Hardy Illustration RCA

reflection LRB © Katherine Hardy RCA

Stories from the Road  Kathrine Hardy RCA_640

Katherine Hardy is a freelance illustrator from the UK who studied at the Royal College of Art. She uses clever colour schemes to create beautiful, whimsical worlds. She is inspired by music and album covers and also sings jazz and blues!

If you’d like to find out more about Katherine Hardy you can read my interview with her here.

You can also visit her portfolio.

Posted by Chloe Baldwin on 08/10/14 under artists
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Making the most of your sketchbooks

 

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Being creatives we all get lost in the blank pages of our oh so faithful sketchbooks, before putting pen to paper we’re filled with anticipation of the ideas we have within our creative minds that are yet to spill across our page.  As they begin to fill with endless inky pieces of potential and piles of scribbled sketchbooks are formed over time they can often become lost sat within a draw of your studio out of sight. Although sometimes it’s breaking out those old books that can help you creatively in ways you don’t always quite realise. So here are a few reasons to brush the dust off your sketchbooks and reminisce a little in past potential you’ve made.

 

  1. They’re proof of how far you’ve come: Your sketchbooks are filled with your thoughts and scribbles and it’s these that also make them memories of your creative growth.  You might one day find yourself thinking “My illustration/design/painting/photography isn’t quite as detailed or good as these creatives” and sometimes we take for granted just how far we have come on our creative journey.  So look back on your own childhood, high school, college or university sketchbooks and see just how far you’ve come, just how hard you’ve worked and you may even surprise yourself with how talented you really are. In turn this is sure to boost your belief in yourself and blow your little inner critic away.

 

  1. Fruits for new inspiration : If at times you’re feeling lost for ideas or aren’t quite sure where to find your inspiration for a new and exciting project then flipping through the pages of your sketchbook might just help you find it. Sometimes we can forget where we found our fruit for ideas but in that little sketchbook may be a scribbled motif that can help you grow a collection of beautiful patterns, illustration for a book, painting and much more. Recycle your old ideas and make them into something amazing and new because your style and skills are forever growing it’s sure to look different than it did before.

 

  1. Rediscover old techniques:  I remember during college days we were encouraged to experiment as much as we could with a vast array of arty materials and techniques to expand on the potential of what we create. Combining watercolours, print making or markers with ink might have helped you to create a beautifully detailed project or give you a texture or effect you’re looking for. It’s little things like these that may just be the finishing element needed for an upcoming project or simply for you to try something a little different.

 

So it just goes to show how good your sketchbooks can be after all and gives you an even better reason to treasure them and not throw them away. Image by designer illustration  Elizabeth Caldwell you can find out more about her work here .

Posted by Kate Leonard on 08/10/14 under creativity
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Holly Exley: expressive, saturated watercolour palettes

Post by Heather Ryerson

Holly Exley

Holly Exley

Holly Exley

Holly Exley

Holly Exley

Holly Exley

Holly Exley’s expressive, saturated colour palettes feel realer than life. Her food illustrations beg to be eaten; her watercolour paintings of British wildlife threaten to flit off the page. Since graduating from Middlesex University, Exley has worked with clients Marks & Spencer, Whole Foods, Topshop, Chronicle Books, BBC Wildlife and more. She lives and paints in London.

Visit her website and her blog.

Posted by Heather Ryerson on 08/08/14 under Blogroll,painterly
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Pick of the Week for PEACE and This Week’s Topic

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Happy Friday!

We’re excited to announce this week’s topic, but first please enjoy the illustration above by Jean Tuttle, our Pick of the Week for last week’s topic of ‘PEACE’. You can also see a gallery of all the other inspiring entries here.

And of course, you can now participate in this week’s topic:

KING

Here’s how:

Step 1: Illustrate your interpretation of the current week’s topic (always viewable on the homepage).

Step 2: Post your image onto your blog / flickr / facebook, etc.

Step 3: Come back to Illustration Friday and submit your illustration (see big “Submit your illustration” button on the homepage).

Step 4: Your illustration will then be added to the participant gallery where it will be viewable along with everyone else’s from the IF community!

Also be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter and subscribe to our weekly email newsletter to keep up with our exciting community updates!

HAPPY ILLUSTRATING!

Posted by Thomas James on 08/08/14 under weekly topics
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Artist: Sharon Tiernan

Sharon Tiernan4

 

 

Being able to return home for part of the summer after another year of University (for me home is Bridlington, East Yorkshire) has enabled me to explore art along the coast of England. Passing by a local art gallery I noticed these wonderful works of art by Sharon Tiernan. Born in Scarborough, it was lovely to see some genuine local talent! The vibrancy of her paintings bring the subjects to life. Tiernan pays attention to detail to create the tones and textures in each piece. Passion is clearly seen in all of her works of art as she tries to make them as realistic as possible, “It is essential for me when acquainting myself with a subject, to aim for accuracy and realism within my work”- Tiernan.

Tiernan studied at the Univeristy of York and gained a Masters in Painting at the University of Hull, therefore it is clear that her skill has been acquired through many years of patience and practice. I took it upon myself to contact the artist directly to gain a better insight into her inspirations and personal background.

Her response can be seen on my personal blog at: http://carlataylorillustration.blogspot.co.uk/2014/08/contacting-artist-sharon-tiernan.html

Why not check out the local art scene in your own area? You might be pleasantly surprised at the talent you find, just like I was!

 

 

Thanks for reading,

Carla

Posted by Carla Taylor on 08/07/14 under artists
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Comics Illustrator of the Week :: Andrew Robinson

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After serving his country in Desert Storm, artist Andrew Robinson attended The Savannah College of Art and Design in the early 90’s. He bounced around the south-eastern states for a while before settling on the west coast in sunny Pasadena, CA. His early comics work first appeared in popular anthologies such as Dark Horse Presents, and Negative Burn.

In the late 90’s he created the critically acclaimed independent comic, Dusty Star, and started to get high profile cover work for DC Comics on titles such as Hawkman, and Starman.

He’s had a resurgence in his comics work of late, with a multitude of new cover illustrations in recent years for Marvel, DC, and Dark Horse, just to name a few. In addition to that, he illustrated the fully painted, award winning graphic novel, The Fifth Beatle: The Brian Epstein Story, which is set to be a major motion picture, soon.

To keep up with the latest news, and artwork by Andrew Robinson, you can go to his blog here.

For more comics related art, you can follow me on my website comicstavern.com - Andy Yates

Posted by Andy Yates on 08/06/14 under artists,comic,illustrationfriday,weekly topics
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Editorial Submission :: Mindy Carpenter

Post by Natalie

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Mindy Carpenter is a painter originally from Victoria, BC and now living in Ashland, Oregon. She worked in the gift and stationery industry for over 15 years and one year ago started her own greeting card company, Carpe Diem Paper, featuring her original paintings. Her happy and nostalgic work includes images from her childhood and objects she has collected over the years including vintage typewriters, trophies, quirky chairs, and funny animals in clothing. She also has a deep connection to the ocean and her paintings are often inspired by nautical subjects and aquatic life. 

See more of Mindy’s work on her website.

Posted by Natalie on 08/06/14 under artists,editorial submissions
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Pick of the Week for GOLDEN and This Week’s Topic

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Happy Friday!

We’re excited to announce this week’s topic, but first please enjoy the illustration above by JW Pang, our Pick of the Week for last week’s topic of ‘REPEAT’. You can also see a gallery of all the other inspiring entries here.

And of course, you can now participate in this week’s topic:

PEACE

Here’s how:

Step 1: Illustrate your interpretation of the current week’s topic (always viewable on the homepage).

Step 2: Post your image onto your blog / flickr / facebook, etc.

Step 3: Come back to Illustration Friday and submit your illustration (see big “Submit your illustration” button on the homepage).

Step 4: Your illustration will then be added to the participant gallery where it will be viewable along with everyone else’s from the IF community!

Also be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter and subscribe to our weekly email newsletter to keep up with our exciting community updates!

HAPPY ILLUSTRATING!

Posted by Thomas James on 08/01/14 under weekly topics
No Comments

Julia Denos: Fashion & Children’s Illustrator

Post by Heather Ryerson

Julia Denos

Julia Denos

Julia Denos

Julia Denos

Julia Denos

Julia Denos’ loose, colorful illustrations are sure to make girls everywhere ooh and ah. Her quick lines and saturated colors say a lot with a little and her playful evocation of texture and pattern is pitch perfect for children’s fashion. She has illustrated numerous picture books for girls like I Had A Favorite Dress, Just Being Audrey, and Grandma’s Gloves. Candlewick Press, HarperCollins, Penguin, RandomHouse, Scholastic, and Highlights are amongst her many clients.

See more of her work on her website.

Posted by Heather Ryerson on 07/31/14 under artists,children's art,editorial submissions
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